Accounting

ACC*100 Basic Accounting

3 credits

An introduction to basic accounting concepts and principles, with an emphasis on their practical application to recording, classifying, and summarizing financial information that flows within a business enterprise. The accounting cycle is examined; along with such areas as sales, purchases, cash, receivables, and payroll. This course is recommended for all students who wish to pursue a degree in accounting and have not taken accounting courses at the high school or college level. Students who have had prior accounting courses and/or have worked in accounting positions should take ACC*113- Principles of Financial Accounting. (Elective Type: G)

ACC*113 Principles of Financial Accounting

3 credits (ACC-105)

Basic concepts and practice of accounting and its role in the economic decision-making process. Topics include the financial statement preparation process for balance sheets; income statements; accounting for cash; receivables; inventories; plant and intangible assets, liabilities and stockholders’ equity. Prerequisites: placement into Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or appropriate placement test score,AND C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065) or placement into Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or appropriate placement test score, OR C- or better in Basic Accounting (ACC*100) OR permission of Department Chair.(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

ACC*117 Principles of Managerial Accounting

3 credits (ACC-205) (27-205)

The use of accounting data by managers for planning and controlling business activities is covered. Topics include cost accounting systems; cost behavior relationships; capital expenditure decision-making; budgeting; and variance analysis. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Financial Accounting (ACC*113). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

ACC*123 Accounting Software Applications

3 credits (ACC-111) (27-110)

Examination of general accounting applications as they apply to computerized financial records for each step of the accounting cycle to the completion of financial statements, as well as management accounting applications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Basic Accounting (ACC*100) or Principles of Financial Accounting (ACC*113) or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CONX) (Ability Assessed: 5)

ACC*241 Federal Taxes I

3 credits (ACC-161) (27-161)

The federal tax structure is examined as it applies to reportable income and allowable deductions in the preparation of the individual income tax return. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

ACC*271 Intermediate Accounting I

3 credits (ACC-201) (27-201)

Introduction to financial statement analysis. Intensive study of classification and evaluation of current assets. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Financial Accounting (ACC*113). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

ACC*272 Intermediate Accounting II

3 credits (ACC-202) (27-202)

Study of non-current assets, analysis of total equity classification, and application of funds-flow reporting are examined. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Accounting I (ACC*271). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

ACC*292 Accounting Practicum

3 credits

Provides students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills gained in the program through an individualized capstone experience, which includes an internship or project component and a classroom component. Internship involves employment or volunteer engagement in a company, public agency, or non-profit organization. Alternatively, students may complete the internship component of the Practicum through directed independent project(s) involving advanced analysis, research, and writing. Both the internship experience and the directed projects are designed to assess the students’ mastery of the program learning objectives, and to further develop their professional skills. Students planning to enroll in the Practicum should meet with the Program Coordinat or to learn of existing Internship opportunities, or to define the elements of a meaningful internship experience either at their current employer or a new internship position. Students are responsible for attaining their own internship. With permission of the Program Coordinator, the internship work hours may occur prior to the students registering for the Practicum. The classroom component involves several seminars or workshops, meeting in the classroom and/or online during the semester to discuss the students’ internship experience, as well as their academic, professional, and career development. In addition, student mastery of general education abilities and program learning outcomes will be assessed. The assessment of these outcomes may include completing a directed project and/or developing an ePortfolio. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator or Business Practicum Instructor.Prior to taking the Business Practicum, students must have completed twelve business core or program option credits with a grade of C- or better, AND have completed at least 40 credits towards their associate degree or 15 credits towards their BA Certificate.(Elective Type:G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

Anthropology

ANT*101 Introduction to Anthropology

3 credits (ANTH-101) (57-121)

Exploration of the diversity of the human community including the search for human origins. Focus is on the cultural evolution of man, lost civilizations, archaeology, and the societies and cultures of nonwestern peoples. How the traditional ways of life of hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads and tribal cultivators are being challenged by present-day technological advancements is also explored. The student’s awareness of cross-cultural diversity in a global context, and understanding of how human societies came to be formed, will be broadened. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading andWriting I (ENG *065);OR placement into Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ANT*121 Introduction to Archeology

3 credits

An introduction to the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archeology The objective is to familiarize students with the strategies that are employed in the investigation of archaeological remains and how these strategies further the aims of an anthropological archaeology. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) OR Introduction to College English (ENG*096) OR Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101) (Elective Type: G/ HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

ANT*142 The Navajo Indians

3 credits

Surveys the past and present experiences of the Navajo Indians, featuring filmed interviews with tribal members on a variety of topics that are integral to their lives. There will be a multi-disciplinary examination of their religion and religious ceremonies, history, psychology, life styles, linguistic patterns, social structure, art forms, and health care. (Elective Type: G/ HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ANT*143 The Mojave Indians

3 credits (IDS-110)

An introduction to the past and present experiences of our Native American population through a many-faceted study of the Mojave Indians and their relations with neighboring tribes in the southwestern United States. Religion, myths, history, psychology, linguistic style, kinship patterns, art forms, and health care will be examined. Interviews with Mojave elders and other tribal members will be featured. (Elective Type: G/ HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ANT*145 The Pueblo Indians

3 credits

Deals with the experiences of the twenty Pueblo tribes, both currently and in the past. Against this backdrop, the course will focus on five of the tribes which are located in Arizona and western and central New Mexico: the Hopi, Zuni, Acoma, Laguna, and the Taos. Through filmed interviews and selected readings, the course will offer a multi-faceted study of Pueblo religion and religious ceremonies, psychology, history, language, and literature, daily life, health care, and artistic expression. (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ANT*205 Cultural Anthropology

3 credits

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of human behavi or and society. Focus will be on enculturation, marriage and family, kinship and descent, gender, community organization, economic institutions, political organization, religion, art, globalization, and change. Prerequisites: C- or better in either Introduction to Anthropology (ANT*101) OR Principles of Sociology (SOC*101), OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

Architecture

ARC*240 Environmental Systems

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab Imparts knowledge of the interior environment of structures large and small. The interrelationship of energy, climate, site, and architectural design are studied. Conservation of nonrenewable energy sources is an intrinsic theme. A study of the design factors in heating, cooling, plumbing, fire protection and electrical systems is included. Prerequisites: Placement into Composition (ENG*101) AND placement into Introductory Algebra (MAT*094). (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

Art/Photography

ART*100 Art Appreciation

3 credits (ART-100) (70-101)

Focus on cultural influence and evolutionary changes in art media as they affect painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts. This course does not fulfill degree requirements for Graphic Design or Visual Fine Arts. (Note: Field trips may be required by the instructor.) (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*101 Art History I

3 credits (ART-103) (70-103)

Study of the major historical periods in Western Civilization. Prehistoric; Ancient; Classical; Early Christian; and Byzantine painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts are examined and analyzed according to art principles and the societies from which they emanate. Museum trips are required. (Elective Type:AH/FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*102 Art History II

3 credits (ART-104) (70-104)

An extensive study of art through the major periods in Western Civilization. Medieval; Renaissance; Mannerist; Baroque; Rococo; and Modern painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts are examined and analyzed according to art principles and the societies from which they emanate. Museum trips are required. (Elective Type: AH/FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*103 Art History III

3 credits (ART-227)

An in-depth look at one of the most dynamic periods in the history of art as they trace the radical changes that occurred in the visual arts from the late 19th century through the postWorld War II era. Emphasis will be placed upon the maj or artists, works, and theories of this period. (Elective Type: AH/ FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*109 Color Theory

3 credits (ART-120) (75-121)

2 lecture/2 studio Exploration and study of color relationships as they apply to diverse media. Investigation of the color wheel and other various applied color schemes. Study of the visual, psychological, and emotional effect color has in our world. Color is examined through fine art, interior design, graphic presentations, industrial applications, and commercial use. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*111 Drawing I

3 credits (ART-109) (74-111)

2 lecture/2 studio Students develop an understanding of perception through observational techniques as well as drawing from imagination. Emphasis is on the consideration of line, shape, form, texture, movement, and space. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*112 Drawing II

3 credits (ART-110) (74-112)

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced-level drawing course, Drawing II emphasizes composition, materials, personal expression, and an understanding of drawing history in relation to contemporary issues of drawing. Projects are designed to enhance the quality of handling materials within a given format. Creative problemsolving techniques are discussed and applied. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing I (ART*111). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*113 Figure Drawing

3 credits (ART-150) (75-171)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduction to human figure drawing concepts and techniques with emphasis on anatomy and personal style. Using the live model as a point of reference, students will explore anatomy, proportion, skeletal structure, musculature, and foreshortening. The figure will be used as a vehicle to express a multitude of ideas concerning interpretive drawing. Mark making, material control, expressive techniques, visual interest, and image styling are major components of this course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing II (ART*112) or consent of Program Coordinator, or Department Chair. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1).

ART*122 Three-Dimensional Design

3 credits (ART-102) (74-122)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduces the student through studio work to the fundamentals of visual design. Assigned problems include explorations of three-dimensional application of line, texture, surface, tone, space, composition, and optics. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*131 Sculpture I

3 credits

1 lecture/3 studio An introduction to the basic concepts of sculptural forms. A project based curriculum focused on diverse materials, spatial concerns, methodologies, symbolism, craft and subject. Students will explore the use of various tools and construction techniques including fabrication and assemblage. Established sculptural artists will be examined in terms of perception and style. Prerequisite: C- or better in Three-Dimensional Design (ART*122). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*132 Sculpture II

3 credits

1 lecture/3 studio A continuation of Sculpture I, advancing technical skills, sculptural theories, material investigation, and conceptual thinking within the three-dimensional framework. Personal style and creative problem solving with three-dimensional forms both contemporary and/or traditional methods will be the primary direction. The class will have serial content as its basis. Material selection will be chosen with the concepts of the pieces and the target presentation site in mind. Prerequisite: C- or better in Sculpture I (ART*131). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*139 Digital Photography f or 3 credits Non-Photo Majors

2 lecture/2 studio

An introduction to the digital photography environment f or non-photo majors. This course will include basic instruction in camera functions such as shutter speed and aperture as they relate to photographic image making. In addition to basic photographic skill building, the course will cover digital specific topics including image editing software and workflow. Strategies for image processing will be taught with an emphasis on utilizing a streamlined workflow from image capture to output. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*141 Photography I

3 credits (PHTG-110) (77-101)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduction to the fundamental operations of the single-lens reflex camera with black & white photographic materials. Darkroom techniques are explored through lecture, demonstration, and assignment. Students will photograph, process negatives, and print enlargements of their own work. Emphasis will be placed on proper camera and darkroom techniques. (Elective Type:FA/G/ HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/ CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1) photography. Students will learn manual camera functions and image editing through lecture, demonstration and assignment. Photographic genres, composition and the technical and aesthetic dimensions of photography are discussed and put into practice. Emphasis will be placed on proper camera use and image processing. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*142 Photography II

3 credits (PHTG-112) (77-103)

2 lecture/2 studio In this extension of Photography I, students can expand into more advanced, experimental and individual work in black & white photography. Exploring the creative potential of the medium, students will explore various speed black & white printing including hand-coloring, surfacing, toning and various darkroom alterations. Large-format cameras are introduced and used to photograph studio setups. Prerequisite: C- or better in Photography I (ART*141). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1) and processes using black & white film and a variety of camera formats. Darkroom techniques are explored through lecture, demonstration, and assignments. Students will photograph, process negatives, and print enlargements of their own work. Emphasis will be placed on proper camera and darkroom techniques. Prerequisite:C- or better in Photography I (ART*141). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*151 Painting I (Acrylics/Oils)

3 credits (ART-211) (75-143)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduction to studio painting techniques, applications, materials and theory. Observational painting from direct sources is the primary focus. Assignments cover progressive skill levels from basic to refined interpretations of subject matter. Painting history is incorporated into discussions and class evaluations. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing II (ART*112) AND Design Principles (GRA*101), OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*152 Painting II (Acrylics/Oils)

3 credits (ART-212) (75-144)

2 lecture/2 studio A continuation of Painting I with a strong emphasis on serial images, expressive paint handling, compositional structure and content. Personal development of ideas is encouraged through class assignments and critiques. Prerequisite: C- or better in Painting I (ART*151).(Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*155 Watercolor I

3 credits (ART-215)

2 lecture/2 studio An introduction to watercolor, this course involves the study of equipment, painting surfaces, and painting techniques. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing I (ART*111). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*156 Watercolor II

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio This course is a continuation of Watercolor I involving further studio exploration of painting surfaces and techniques with emphasis upon color mixes, values, arrangements, and schemes. Prerequisites: C- or better in Drawing I (ART*111) and C- or better inWatercolor I (ART*155). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*201 Contemporary Art in the USA

3 credits

Study of the development of the diversity of styles in contemporary art and their reflections of the society in which they were created. Reviews modern trends, emphasizing 1940 to the present. (Elective Type:AH/FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*205 History of Photography

3 credits (PHTG-100)

Surveys the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present. Examines major photographic artists, movements in photography, technical developments in the medium, and the relationships between photography and the historical and cultural contexts in which it is developed. (Elective Type:AH/FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1) its inception in 1839 to the present. Photography’s relationship to its historical, social and cultural context is considered. Students will examine major photographic artists, movements in photography and technical developments in the medium. (Elective Type: AH/FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*211 Drawing III

3 credits (ART-210)

2 lecture/2 studio An extension of Drawing II, this course moves into evolved imagemaking with numerous materials, including pastels, watercolors, and collage. The subjective information will address narrative, serial, and large- and small- scale issues. Various drawing formats will be discussed and applied within the student’s personal stylistic direction. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing II (ART*112).(Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*212 Drawing IV

3 credits (ART-223)

2 lecture/2 studio A culminating drawing course in the visual fine art program emphasizing refinement and technical skill. Upon completion of Drawing III the student will explore technical refinement and study aspects of interpretive drawing that relate to the development of an individual’s process. Building on the Drawing III, content the individual will continue to pursue a self-chosen style of drawing that becomes the focus for subjective and ideological concerns. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing III (ART*211) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*215 Illustration

3 credits (ART-200) (75-211)

2 lecture/2 studio Problems in illustration are presented to introduce the student to the many facets of the illustration field. Print illustration, book illustration, catalog illustration, and web illustration are a few of the topics covered in this class. Digital and 3-D computer illustration will be presented as alternatives to traditional illustration techniques. Processes involved during the course are as followed but not limited to: Scratchboard, watercolor, ink, fine acrylic, gouache, colored pencil, and pastel. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing II (ART*112). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*220 Electronic Painting and Drawing

3 credits (74-220)

2 lecture/2 studio Designed for either Fine Art or Graphic Design majors focused on creative interpretation of art forms with the program Painter on the computer. Projects cover a broad range of subject matter from the representational to creative abstraction. Emphasis is on compositional arrangement, color, form, and creative use of Painter’s tools and palettes. Completed projects are printed on high-end ink jet printers. Prerequisite: C- or better in Drawing I (ART*111). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*221 Electronic Painting and Drawing II

3 credits (74-220)

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced course in computer art imaging that increases the students’ abilities in producing computer images that demonstrate greater technical skills, advanced form construction, narrative image making, personal style, and content. Professional artists are discussed through their respective works and analyzed for their specific content and technique. Projects are oriented towards large scale with thematic structures, and a framework of consistent ideas. Electronic collage is a featured aspect of this course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Electronic Painting and Drawing (ART*220). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*240 Nature Photography

3 credits (PHTG-215)

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced photography course focusing on nature, the elements of nature and the various approaches to nature from a photographic standpoint. Landscape imagery, close range subjects, atmospheric conditions, and natural and artificial lighting techniques will be presented and applied. All shooting will occur in natural settings and in various locations. Both black and white and color photography will be employed. (It is recommended that Studio Photography I (ART*243) be taken prior to this course, but it is not required. Prerequisite: C or better in Photography I (ART*141). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1) ART*XXX Photography III 3 credits 2 lecture/2 studio Students can expand into more advanced, experimental and individual work in analog and digital photography. Exploring the creative potential of the medium, students will explore various processes and techniques including advanced printing and image alterations. Demonstrations will take place throughout the course but ultimately the student’s choice of focus is selfdirected. Prerequisite: C- or better in Photography II (ART*142). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*243 Studio Photography I

3 credits (PHTG-213)

2 lecture/2 studio In this study of the diverse variations and applications of lighting, studio strobes, flash, reflectors, tungsten, and naturallighting situations will be examined. Combinations of various techniques and environments will also be explored. Exercises range from portraiture to experimental work. Prerequisite: C or better in Photography I (ART*141). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1) and the vast possibilities of working within the photographic studio environment. Through demonstrations, lectures and hands-on assignments, students will learn how to control lighting through the use of strobes and continuous light sources. Standard studio practice and creative problem solving are both emphasized throughout this course. Prerequisite: C or better in Photography I (ART*141). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*245 Photographic Computer

3 credits Manipulation

2 lecture/2 studio (PHTG-214) This computer-based course focuses on the use of the computer to alter and manipulate photographic images. Slide scanning, flatbed scanning, and image conversion will be addressed. A thorough examination is made of basic digital electronic techniques, output means, and the possibility of image alterations. Styles and opportunities in the field will be discussed. Prerequisites:C- or better in Photography I (ART*141), AND C- or better in Introduction to Computer Graphics (GRA*110) OR Electronic Painting and Drawing (ART*220); OR permission of the Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*250 Digital Photography

3 credits (PHTG-230)

2 lecture/2 studio A course completely devoted to the photographic digital environment. The digital camera will be used as the primary tool to photograph all subject matter. Digital output, scanning, and file management are concerns that are addressed and detailed within the course content. Students will learn to control the digital camera and peripherals to attain the best results with the digital photograph. All normal circumstances of photography (lighting, etc.) are applied to the digital environment. Prerequisite: C- or better in Photography I (ART*141) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*257 Commercial Photography

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced photographic lighting course focusing on lighting techniques used by professional photographers in the studio and on location. Emphasis on controlled lighting conditions and visual styling techniques. Technical understanding and personal style are primary concerns in creating visual images in the photographic medium. Prerequisites: C- or better in Photography I (ART*141) and Studio Photography I (ART*243). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY)

ART*284 Pastels

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio A course devoted exclusively to the medium of chalk pastel. Exploration of drawing, blending, and shaping of forms in color with soft pastels on various pastel papers using diverse techniques. Subject matter will be extracted from observation, nature, the human figure, imagination, abstraction, semiabstraction, and the photographic image. Prerequisites: C- or better in Drawing II (ART*112) or consent of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ART*289 Portfolio Preparation

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio The final course in the Photography Degree is an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during their time in the program towards a meaningful project which will culminate in a portfolio of images presented in a professional format. Critiques will take place throughout the course but ultimately the student’s choice of focus is self-directed. At the conclusion of this course students will present their work in a gallery exhibition. Prerequisites: C- or better in Photography II (ART*142) and C- or better in Studio Photography I (ART*243).(Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY)

Astronomy

AST*111 Introduction to Astronomy

4 credits (SCI-178) (52-131)

3 lecture/2 lab Descriptive overview of the origin and evolution of the universe; historical evolution of our earth and moon and other planets and satellites in our solar system. Understanding our sun and basic concepts of nuclear processes fueling the sun and other stars in the Milky Way as well as distant galaxies; and study of cosmology. Descriptive and historical principles are emphasized. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139), or placement into Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9) & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or placement into any credit-level mathematics course.(Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/ SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

Biology

BIO*111 Introduction to Nutrition

3 credits (BIO-111) (57-156)

Investigates the principles of nutrition with respect to basic body needs, the scope of nutrients and foods satisfying those needs, and the results that can be expected in terms of human health when nutrient intake is adequate, deficient, or excessive. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075 or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162); or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

BIO*115 Human Biology

4 credits (BIO-117) (57-173)

3 lecture/2 lab Emphasizes basic human physiology and provides students with an understanding of the human body in health and disease. Aids students in coping with particular health concerns. Attention is drawn to such environmental problems as the relationship between sunlight and skin cancer and the ecological effects of biotechnology. No dissection is required. This one semester course cannot be used to fulfill prerequisites for advanced biology courses. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162);or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

BIO*121 General Biology I

4 credits (BIO-121) (57-141)

3 lecture/3 lab Study of the physical and chemical nature of the cell, including biochemistry, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration. Additional focus on topics of cell division, genetics, and understanding of DNA and RNA processes. It is recommended that the student take Concepts of Chemistry prior to or concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

BIO*122 General Biology II

4 credits (BIO-122) (57-142)

3 lecture/3 lab A comparative study of systems, covering specific organisms in the five major Kingdoms: Monera, Fungi, Protists, Plants, and Animals. Emphasis on taxonomy, diversity of life, and the evolution of systems as manifested by the influences of genetics and the environment. Dissection is required. Prerequisites: C or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

BIO*155 General Botany

4 credits (BIO-222) (63-121)

3 lecture/3 lab Introduces basic principles of plant structure, function, and reproduction including the diversity of plants and environmental influences on plant growth and survival. Applied topics include human uses of plants in agriculture, commerce, medicine and ecology. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

BIO*211 Anatomy and Physiology I

4 credits (BIO-225) (61-111)

3 lecture/3 lab The structure and function of the human body will be discussed in depth for each of the organ systems. Physiology will be presented from a biochemical and organ point of view. Prerequisites: C- or better in General Biology I (BIO*121) AND C- or better in Concepts of Chemistry (CHE*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/ SCRX) (Ability Assessed: 8) (Ability Assessed: 8)

BIO*212 Anatomy and Physiology II

4 credits (BIO-226) (61-112)

3 lecture/3 lab Continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Lecture and Laboratory. Dissection is required. Prerequisite: C- or better in Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO*211). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

BIO*235 Microbiology

4 credits (BIO-250) (57-261)

3 lecture/3 lab Introduction to microorganisms: bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, microscopic algae, and some multicellular parasites. Bacteria and their role in health and disease are emphasized. Skills of observing, gathering, and reporting data, drawing conclusions, identifying problems, and procedure evaluation emphasized. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: C- or better in Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO*211) or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G/ LAS/S) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

Business—General

BBG*101 Introduction to Business

3 credits

Introduces the principles and practices of business management. Topics include: Informational and legal foundations for business management; economic, regulatory, and societal environment of business; entrepreneurship, finance, and marketing; planning, organizing, leading and controlling a business organization. (Elective Type: G)

BBG*115 Business Software Applications

3 credits

This hands-on course is designed for Business Administration/ Marketing majors to utilize the microcomputer as a tool as they relate to the business environment. These software packages include an emphasis on Excel to build flexible spreadsheets used in business decision-making, supplemented with Word to produce professional-looking documents, Access to select and analyze data to produce valid results, and Powerpoint to effectively present and communicate. Social networking sites and their impact upon business will be explored. Individual and group projects will require students to utilize the MS Suite to prepare business documents, produce in-house publications and create business presentations using themes, tables and graphs. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065) or placement into Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) OR Introduction to College English (ENG*096) OR Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), OR Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CONX) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BBG*214 e-Business

3 credits

This course covers the basics of how to start and manage an e-business enterprise and examines the impact of the internet on business and how it has expanded a firm’s ability to customize its product and service offerings. Emphasis is on new venture finance, the economics of e-commerce, as well as the special finance and business management problems associated with e-commerce such as on-line payments, security, customer service, and inventory control. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BBG*215 Global Business

3 credits

An examination of international trade and multinational business and the expanding global economic integration. Topics discussed include the economic, political, legal, social, and cultural environment for global business, international trade theory and praxis, international financial markets and system, international economic and financial institutions, and an analysis of global business management issues such as global marketing, distribution, production, financial control, and managing a multicultural workforce, as well as questions of ethics and social responsibility. Prerequisites: C- or better in Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN*101).(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

BBG*231 Business Law I

3 credits (BUS-102) (29-141)

Examines the history and evolution of law in the United States. Specific topics include: Constitutional Law, the Bill of Rights, courts and procedures, tort law, criminal law, contract law, and business organizations. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU) (Ability Assessed: 2)

BBG*232 Business Law II

3 credits (BUS-202) (29-142)

A study of business law as defined by the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Specific topics include contracts involving the sale of goods, warranties and product liability, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, property law, and creditors’ rights and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: C- or better in Business Law I (BBG*231). (Elective Type: G/HU) (Ability Assessed: 2)

BBG*237 e-Commerce Law & Ethics

3 credits

The legal environment and ethical issues of e-commerce are examined. The scope of the global legal context is applied to internet-based businesses that, through necessity, operate across borders and legal systems. This course establishes a foundation for students to understand the legal and ethical implications of this new business environment. (Elective Type: G/HU) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

BBG*240 Business Ethics

3 credits (BUS-204) (25-127)

A critical examination (both practical and theoretical) of contemporary moral problems in business, such as employee rights and responsibilities, pay equity and comparable worth, whistle-blowing, trade secrets and confidentiality, conflict of interest, discrimination and sexual harassment, pollution, consumer protection, professional ethics, truth-telling in business dealings, social responsibility of business, and fiduciary responsibility to stockholders and stakeholders. It is recommended that students take at least six (6) credits in Business, Economics, or Philosophy, or English prior to taking this course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

BBG*290 Business Programs Capstone

1 credits

For students who are in their final semester of study in the Business Administration Degree and Option programs, but will not be taking a Practicum course, the Business Programs Capstone is designed to help students demonstrate competency in General Education Abilities and Program Learning Outcomes. Throughout their program at Tunxis, students will have been compiling a portfolio of best work that demonstrates mastery of General Education Abilities, as well as Program Learning Outcomes. In this course, students will complete the development of their portfolio and, depending on the program, possibly sit for an exit exam or project. Students will also reflect on their learning experience at Tunxis and in their program. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101), and 12 credits in Business courses.Note: Students should be enrolled in their final semester of classes.(Elective Type:G) (Abilities Assessed: 5, 6)

BBG*292 Business Practicum

3 credits

Provides students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills gained in the program through an individualized capstone experience, which includes an internship or project component and a classroom component. Internship involves employment or volunteer engagement in a company, public agency, or non-profit organization. Alternatively, students may complete the internship component of the Practicum through directed independent project(s) involving advanced analysis, research, and writing. Both the internship experience and the directed projects are designed to assess the students’ mastery of the program learning objectives, and to further develop their professional skills. Students planning to enroll in the Practicum should meet with the Program Coordinat or or Practicum Instructor to learn of existing Internship opportunities, or to define the elements of a meaningful internship experience either at their current employer or a new internship position. Students are responsible for attaining their own internship. With permission of the Program Coordinat or or Practicum instructor, the internship work hours may occur prior to the students registering for the Practicum. The classroom component involves several seminars or workshops, meeting in the classroom and/or online during the semester to discuss the students’ internship experience, as well as their academic, professional, and career development. In addition, student mastery of general education abilities and program learning outcomes will be assessed. The assessment of these outcomes may include completing a directed project and/ or developing an ePortfolio. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator or Business Practicum Instructor. Prior to taking the Business Practicum, students must have completed twelve business core or program option credits with a grade of C- or better, AND have completed at least 40 credits towards their associate degree or 15 credits towards their BA Certificate. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

Business—Entrepreneurship

BES*218 Entrepreneurship

3 credits (BUS-225)

Introduces students to the art of entrepreneurship and the skills needed for starting and managing small businesses. It begins with a self-assessment of entrepreneurial skills and continues through a survey of all the major issues in new and small business management. Students are expected to develop a complete business plan. The teaching methodology relies heavily on experimental exercises, student team projects and case studies. Prerequisites: C- or better in Principles of Marketing (BMK*201), Principles of Financial Accounting (ACC*113) AND Composition (ENG*101), OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

Business—Finance

BFN*110 Personal Finance

3 credits

Provides an overview of the financial planning and investing process. It examines personal incomes and budgets, home and consumer financing, insurance of personal assets, personal investing and retirement planning. Topics covered will include the time value of money, investments, loans and credit, cash management, taxes, life and health insurance, and estate planning. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

BFN*201 Principles of Finance

3 credits (BUS-209)

An introduction to the principles of financial management and the impact of the financial markets and institutions on that managerial function. Major topics include the environment of financial management, evaluation of a firm’s financial performance, financial forecasting, working capital management, corporate securities and financing the short- and long-term requirements of the firm, time value of money, capital and cash budgeting, the relationship of risk to return, cost of capital, leverage, and evaluation of alternative methods of financing. An analytical emphasis will be placed on the tools and techniques of the investment, financing, and dividend decision. Prerequisites: C- or better in Principles of Financial Accounting (ACC*113), C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101), OR permission of Department Chair. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139), or placement into higher mathematics, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

BFN*203 Investment Principles

3 credits (BUS-207) (23-111)

An introduction to the principles and concepts of investment analysis and the valuation of various financial instruments. Topics include the functioning of financial markets; valuation of various investment vehicles, such as common stocks, preferred securities, bonds, mutual funds, warrants, options, and other derivatives; and modern portfolio theory. Students will participate in an investment simulation to provide realistic experience in portfolio management. Prerequisite: C or better in Principles of Finance (BFN*201). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

BFN*292 Finance Practicum

3 credits

Provides students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills gained in the program through an individualized capstone experience, which includes an internship or project component and a classroom component. Internship involves employment or volunteer engagement in a company, public agency, or non-profit organization. Alternatively, students may complete the internship component of the Practicum through directed independent project(s) involving advanced analysis, research, and writing. Both the internship experience and the directed projects are designed to assess the students’ mastery of the program learning objectives, and to further develop their professional skills. Students planning to enroll in the Practicum should meet with the Program Coordinat or or Practicum Instructor to learn of existing Internship opportunities, or to define the elements of a meaningful internship experience either at their current employer or a new internship position. Students are responsible for attaining their own internship. With permission of the Program Coordinat or or Practicum instructor, the internship work hours may occur prior to the students registering for the Practicum. The classroom component involves several seminars or workshops, meeting in the classroom and/or online during the semester to discuss the students’ internship experience, as well as their academic, professional, and career development. In addition, student mastery of general education abilities and program learning outcomes will be assessed. The assessment of these outcomes may include completing a directed project and/ or developing an ePortfolio. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator or Business Practicum Instructor. Prior to taking the Business Practicum, students must have completed twelve business core or program option credits with a grade of C- or better, AND have completed at least 40 credits towards their associate degree or 15 credits towards their BA Certificate. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

Business—Management

BMG*202 Principles of Management

3 credits (BUS-101) (28-111)

Integrates the study of management principles with the development of leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal skills. Topics include the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions of management; as well as group dynamics, team building, leadership, conflict and change, diversity, and organizational culture. Through experiential and group exercises and case studies, students will gain experience in teamwork, leadership, problem solving, and decision-making. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

BMG*210 Organizational Behavi or 3 credits (BUS-201) (28-112)

Study of individual and group processes and behavior in

organizational context, organizational structure and design, organizational culture and the management of organizational change. Topics include motivation, learning, group dynamics, communication, decision making, leadership, conflict, power, political behavior, and organizational culture. Prerequisite: C or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 10, 11)

BMG*220 Human Resources Management

3 credits (BUS-203) (28-261)

Introduction to the functions of Human Resource Management in today’s dynamic business environment. Topics include but are not limited to personnel, planning, recruitment, testing, training, compensation, motivation, appraisals, discipline, and career management. In addition, the welfare and safety of employees, harmonious working relations, equal employment, and international and diversity issues will be discussed. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

BMG*280 Management of the

3 credits Virtual Organization

The science and application of management principles are constantly changing as organizations change to be more flexible and cost effective. The virtual organization, team based organizations, and networked organizations are just a few of the new configurations that are encountered in today’s business world. This course exposes students to these new organizations, to help them apply management principles to these structures and equip them to work in the present-day global workplace. Prerequisite: C- or better in eBusiness (BBG*214) OR permission of Department Chair.(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

Business—Marketing

BMK*103 Principles of Retailing

3 credits (MKT-103) (25-101)

Introduction to the technical and theoretical aspects of retailing. Areas of emphasis include merchandise management, buying, pricing, site selection, operations, and human resources management. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075),OR C- or better in Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G)

BMK*201 Principles of Marketing

3 credits (MKT-101) (25-111)

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of marketing. Examination of effective practices of product development, distribution, price structure, and promotion throughout the marketing process, including research, execution and evaluation. Prerequisities: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075), or C- or better in Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101); Co-requisite: Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BMK*207 Consumer Behavi or 3 credits (MKT-201) (25-121)

A study of consumer behavior with an emphasis on the

complexity of consumer decision-making and how consumers influence current marketing practices. Topics include consumer decision-making, advertising, consumer-trend analysis, marketing strategy, and consumer buying behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Marketing (BMK*201). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

BMK*214 International Marketing

3 credits

An analysis of the techniques, procedures, and strategies used by multinational firms. Emphasis on the economic, cultural, political/ legal and technological factors that influence the marketing of consumer and business goods. Methods and sources of data f or determining products to sell and countries in which to sell them are studied. Prerequisites: C- or better in Principles of Marketing (BMK*201).(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

BMK*216 Internet Marketing

3 credits

This course examines how the Internet has brought new capabilities to the marketing function. Students revisit the basic tenets of marketing and assess the impact of the Internet on these basic principles, addressing benefits as well as the limitations of Internet Marketing. Emphasis is on the practical application of electronic commerce technology solutions to the elements of the marketing mix and the implementation of marketing plans. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Marketing (BMK*201). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BMK*245 Integrated Marketing

3 credits Communications

The planning, design, integration, and management of contemporary marketing communications. The course focuses on the unification of advertising, direct marketing, Internet and interactive marketing, sales promotion, publicity and public relations, and personal selling with an emphasis on the competitive and strategic value of communications in the marketplace. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Marketing (BMK*201). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

BMK*283 Marketing Management

3 credits

The management application of marketing to the decisionmaking process in profit and nonprofit enterprises. Primary emphasis is on the development, implementation, management and evaluation of total marketing programs through casestudy analysis. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Marketing Communications(BMK*245) OR Consumer Behavior (BMK*207), AND C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

BMK*292 Practicum in Marketing

3 credits (MKT-250)

Provides students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills gained in the program through an individualized capstone experience, which includes an internship or project component and a classroom component. Internship involves employment or volunteer engagement in a company, public agency, or non-profit organization. Alternatively, students may complete the internship component of the Practicum through directed independent project(s) involving advanced analysis, research, and writing. Both the internship experience and the directed projects are designed to assess the students’ mastery of the program learning objectives, and to further develop their professional skills. Students planning to enroll in the Practicum should meet with the Program Coordinator or Practicum Instructor to learn of existing Internship opportunities, or to define the elements of a meaningful internship experience either at their current employer or a new internship position. Students are responsible for attaining their own internship. With permission of the Program Coordinator or Practicum instructor, the internship work hours may occur prior to the students registering for the Practicum. The classroom component involves several seminars or workshops, meeting in the classroom and/or online during the semester to discuss the students’ internship experience, as well as their academic, professional, and career development. In addition, student mastery of general education abilities and program learning outcomes will be assessed. The assessment of these outcomes may include completing a directed project and/ or developing an ePortfolio. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator or Business Practicum Instructor. Prior to taking the Business Practicum, students must have completed twelve business core or program option credits with a grade of C- or better, AND have completed at least 40 credits towards their associate degree or 15 credits towards their BA Certificate. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

BMK*294 Retail Business

Management Practicum

3 credits (MKT-204) (27-431) Provides students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills gained in the program through an individualized capstone experience, which includes an internship or project component and a classroom component. Internship involves employment or volunteer engagement in a company, public agency, or non-profit organization. Alternatively, students may complete the internship component of the Practicum through directed independent project(s) involving advanced analysis, research, and writing. Both the internship experience and the directed projects are designed to assess the students’ mastery of the program learning objectives, and to further develop their professional skills. Students planning to enroll in the Practicum should meet with the Program Coordinat or or Practicum Instructor to learn of existing Internship opportunities, or to define the elements of a meaningful internship experience either at their current employer or a new internship position. Students are responsible for attaining their own internship. With permission of the Program Coordinat or or Practicum instructor, the internship work hours may occur prior to the students registering for the Practicum. The classroom component involves several seminars or workshops, meeting in the classroom and/or online during the semester to discuss the students’ internship experience, as well as their academic, professional, and career development. In addition, student mastery of general education abilities and program learning outcomes will be assessed. The assessment of these outcomes may include completing a directed project and/ or developing an ePortfolio. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator or Business Practicum Instructor. Prior to taking the Business Practicum, students must have completed twelve business core or program option credits with a grade of C- or better, AND have completed at least 40 credits towards their associate degree or 15 credits towards their BA Certificate. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

Business Office Technology

BOT*111 Keyboarding f or Information Processing I

3 credits (BOT-101) (22-101)

An introduction to the keyboard. The student will learn to keyboard by the touch method covering the entire letter, figure, and symbol reaches. The course will also provide students with applications of keyboarding skill. This will be in the form of both accuracy and speed development and in the following basic word processing skills: create, format, save, print and open a document. Other basic formatting applications such as centering copy horizontally and vertically, proper word division and personal and business correspondence will also be emphasized. All course work is to be completed on an IBM compatible pc. This is a touch-typing course at the beginning level of skill designed to familiarize the student with the keyboard and correct keyboarding techniques. (Elective Type:G)

BOT*137 Word Processing Applications

3 credits (BOT-102) (22-102)

An intermediate course with tabulation problems, special forms, various models of business letters, reports, and rough drafts with special attention paid to good judgment and problemsolving activities. There will also be the continuation of speed and accuracy building. All course work is to be completed on a window-based computer using Microsoft Word 2010. The student must be able to follow oral and written instructions with minimum supervision. Prerequisite:C- or better in Keyboarding f or Information Processing I (BOT*111) OR permission of Program Coordinator OR waiver. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BOT*180 Medical Terminology

3 credits (BOT-113)

A basic study of medical vocabulary. It introduces word construction, pronunciation, prefixes, suffixes, and root words. This course is designed to provide application of complex medical terminology to areas of medical science, hospital service and health-related professions. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101), or permission of Program Coordinator. Co-requisite: Keyboarding for Information Processing I (BOT*111) or permission of Program Coordinator.(Elective Type:G) (Abilities Assessed:2,3)

BOT*181 Medical Coding I

3 credits (BOT-214)

The study of basic ICD-10-CM and CPT coding. Diagnoses, procedures, signs and symptoms will be studied and coded using the necessary textbooks and professional publications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Medical Terminology (BOT*180) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

BOT*182 Medical Coding II

3 credits

A continuation of concepts introduced in Medical Coding I. Students will utilize medical records and case histories to code the diagnoses and procedures according to the level of care received in the appropriate medical facilities. Prerequisites: C- or better in Medical Coding I (BOT*181) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

BOT*210 Computerized Office Applications

3 credits (BOT-216)

Provides students with hands-on experience in spreadsheet applications and presentation graphics. Students will utilize an integrated software package to complete business projects. Prerequisite: C- or better in Word Processing Applications II (BOT*215) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 5, 6)

BOT*215 Word Processing Applications II

3 credits (BOT-201) (22-107)

Equips students with the problem-solving and decisionmaking skills necessary to operate a word processing system. The course covers more complex operations performed on a word processor as well as continued speed and accuracy development. Concepts will be stressed. Familiarity with the technical and functional operations of the word processor and several specialized types of operations such as merge, graphics, and pagination, will be utilized. Proofreading and communications as they relate to the efficient operation of a word-processing system will be essential. Individualized self-instructional programs will be used for hands-on learning. Prerequisite: C- or better in Word ProcessingApplications (BOT*137) OR permission of Program Coordinator.(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BOT*219 Integrated Office

3 credits (BOT-204) (22-239)

Provides students with hands-on experience in database management. Topics include the role of administrative support services, use of various computer software skills, electronic communication, and the internet. Students will utilize an integrated software package (word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics) to complete business projects. Prerequisite: C- or better in Computerized Office Applications (BOT*210) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

BOT*251 Administrative Procedures

3 credits (BOT-203) (22-238)

Introduces students to up-to-date methods of information management in the office. Topics include records management, setting priorities, and machine transcription. Students are introduced to effective self-marketing techniques and business research methods. Pre- or co-requisite: C- or better in Word Processing Applications (BOT*137) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 5, 6)

BOT*287 Foundations/Management

3 credits Medical Insurance

This course is designed to develop the abilities and skills that will enable students to define and explain the role of the health insurance specialist, major types of health insurance policies, contracts, guidelines, laws, and the reimbursement cycle. Comparisons of private insurances, State, and Federal programs are covered as well as analysis and completion of appropriate insurance forms and application information. Emphasis will be placed on pertinent legal and ethical issues as well as protected health information and confidentiality. Corerequisite: C- or better in Medical Coding I (BOT*181). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5)

BOT*288 Medical Practice Management

3 credits Software Applications

This hands-on computer applications course prepares medical administrative professionals to efficiently use practice management software in managing the operational, patient, and financial data in medical offices and hospital environments. Software skills covered will include appointment scheduling, patient registration, procedure posting, primary and secondary insurance billing, electronic payment posting, patient billing and collections, report generation and file maintenance. Prerequisite: C- or better in bothWord Processing Applications (BOT*137), and Medical Coding I (BOT*181); and placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

BOT*291 Electronic Health Records

3 credits

Introduces the health information technology (HIT) utilized in electronic health records (EHR) systems and fiscal management. Students will obtain hands-on experience through integrated practice management software to obtain a comprehensive picture with an emphasis on quality assurance, legal, and ethical practices of documenting the clinical and administrative tasks that take place for a total patient encounter. Prerequisite: C- or better in Medical Practice Management Software Applications (BOT*288). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

BOT*295 Administrative Practicum

3 credits (BOT-207)(22-227)

Provides an integration of knowledge gained in previous program courses through review and practical application with special emphasis on decision-making responsibilities. On-thejob experience in a business or professional office previously approved by the Program Coordinator will be required. Parameters of the work experience will be established under the direction of the faculty member. Students will participate in the work experience under the supervision of personnel in the assigned position who will coordinate and evaluate a student’s performance with the college instructor. Hours will be arranged by mutual consent of the student and employer. Prerequisites: Program Enrollment,completion of 12 credits in the BOT discipline, and permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

Chemistry

CHE*111 Concepts of Chemistry

4 credits (CHE-110) (54-128)

3 lecture/2 lab Fundamental principles and methods of chemistry are studied, including atomic theory, bonding, stoichiometry, and thermodynamics. Provides an introduction to physical, nuclear, organic, and biological chemistry. Suitable for students needing a brief survey course or science elective; not intended for science or engineering majors. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085), or IntroductoryAlgebra (MAT*094),or ElementaryAlgebra Foundations (MAT*095), or placement into any credit-level mathematics course. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

CHE*121 General Chemistry I

4 credits (CHE-121) (54-131)

3 lecture/3 lab The fundamental principles, theories, and laws of chemistry are studied. Topics include: atomic theory and the structure of the atom, the aggregated states of matter, kinetic molecular theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, periodicity, solutions and colloids. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9) Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). Intermediate Algebra for Liberal Arts (MAT*137L) is NOT sufficient for entry into this course.

CHE*122 General Chemistry II

4 credits (CHE-122) (54-132)

3 lecture/3 lab Further study of the principles, theories and laws of chemistry. Topics include: thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibria, oxidation and reduction reactions, descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds and an introduction to organic and nuclear chemistry. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in General Chemistry I (CHE*121). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

CHE*210 Introduction to Organic Chemistry

4 credits

3 lecture/4 lab A one-semester survey of organic chemistry. Includes nomenclature, aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, functional groups, reaction mechanisms, biochemistry, organic syntheses and modern techniques of instrumental analyses. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in General Chemistry I (CHE*121) or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

CHE*211 Organic Chemistry I

4 credits (CHE-211)

3 lecture/4 lab A general introduction to organic chemistry, the study of carbon compounds. Topics include: molecular structure and properties, including molecular orbitals and bonding; conjugation and resonance; reaction; thermodynamics, including energy of activation and transition state; stereochemistry; stereoselective and stereospecific reactions; chemistry of aliphatic compounds: alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes and their derivatives; free-radical and electrophilic reactions; and cyclic aliphatic compounds. Laboratory sessions will illustrate fundamental techniques of organic chemistry using semi-micro and micro scale apparatus as well as instrumental methods of analysis, including gas chromatography and infra-red spectroscopy. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: C- or better in General Chemistry II (CHE*122) or permission of Department Chair or 1 year general college Chemistry. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

CHE*212 Organic Chemistry II

4 credits (CHE-212)

3 lecture/4 lab Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, phenols, and aryl halides. Reaction mechanism studies include carbanions, electrophilic substitutions and nucleophilic additions and nucleophilic substitutions. Laboratory sessions continue principles initiated in the precursor course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Organic Chemistry I (CHE*211). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

CHE*213 Principles of Organic Chemistry I -

Lecture only

3 credits A general introduction to organic chemistry, the study of carbon compounds. Topics include: molecular structure and properties, including molecular orbitals and bonding; conjugation and resonance; reaction; thermodynamics, including energy of activation and transition state; stereochemistry; stereoselective and stereospecific reactions; chemistry of aliphatic compounds: alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes and their derivatives; free-radical and electrophilic reactions; and cyclic aliphatic compounds. Intended for students who have successfully completed Organic Chemistry Laboratory sessions but who wish to review their lecture component without repeating the laboratory requirement. This course is not intended for those students who believe they only need the lecture or do not have time for the laboratory requirements, as the laboratory sessions will not be available later alone. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisites: C- or better in General Chemistry II (CHE*122) or 1 year general college Chemistry; and permission of department chair. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

CHE*214 Principles of Organic Chemistry II -

Lecture only

3 credits Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include: aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, phenols and aryl halides. Reaction mechanism studies include carbanions, electrophilic substitutions and nucleophilic additions and nucleophilic substitutions. This course is intended for students who have successfully completed Organic Chemistry Laboratory sessions but who wish to review their lecture component without repeating the laboratory requirement. This course is not intended for those students who believe they only need the lecture or do not have time for the laboratory requirements, as the laboratory sessions will not be available later alone. This course is the second of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisites: C- or better in Organic ChemistryI (CHE*211) or Principles of Organic Chemistry I (CHE*213), and permission of department chair. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

Chinese

CHI*111 Elementary Chinese I

4 credits

Presents the essentials of Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese. Course includes essential grammar in Chinese using simple phrases and common expressions and highlights the diverse cultures of Chinese-Speaking peoples. Context for learning is self, family, school and community. Note: Not appropriate f or native speakers of Chinese. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

CHI*112 Elementary Chinese II

4 credits

Builds and expands skills from Elementary Chinese I with further study of Chinese grammar, sentence patterns, vocabulary and the diverse cultures of Chinese-speaking peoples. Students begin to negotiate simple transactions and address the challenges of daily life in the Chinese culture. Context for learning is based on activities from daily life. Note: Course is not appropriate for Native Speakers of Chinese. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Chinese I (CHI*101 or CHI*111) or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

College Preparation

CSS-013 College Study Skills

3 credits

Provides students with the academic skills necessary f or success in college and begins to prepare them for the rigors of college level work. Students learn and practice specific study skills and strategies through reading, writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations and workshops. Students discover their own learning styles and develop learning and study plans based on their educational goals and current lifestyles. This three-credit course is strongly recommended for all students who have placed in Integrated Reading andWriting I (ENG*065).This course does not satisfy an elective in any degree program; neither do its credits count toward graduation.

CSS-099 Portfolio Workshop f or 1 credit Introduction to College English

Provides support for students who have submitted complete

portfolios for Introduction to College English (ENG*096) that have not quite met the course abilities. This is a workshop f or students who need additional time and practice to demonstrate the course abilities. Provides instruction in a lab setting to address Introduction to College English skill areas. Prerequisite: Recommendation of Introduction to College English (ENG*096) faculty. (Elective Type: G)

CSS-100 Student Development Seminar

3 credits (01-102)

Student Development Seminar is a course for first-year students that addresses issues relating to the transition to college. Students learn strategies for academic success through the use of learning styles research, goal setting/academic planning, and learning and practicing study skills. Students reflect on and analyze learning experiences, learn about campus resources, and explore career options. This three-credit course can be used as a general elective. (Elective Type: G)

CSS-101 First Year Experience

3 credits

First Year Experience prepares students to develop their own plan for academic, personal and professional success through self-evaluation, application of specific strategies, discussions, guided journaling and classroom exercises. These activities help students acquire effective study strategies, stimulate critical thinking, practice oral and written expression, establish goals, identify and participate in the co-curricular life of the college, encourage meaningful relationships with professors and classmates, and choose behaviors leading to a more successful academic experience. This three credit college-level course is strongly recommended for all students who are new to college. (Elective Type: G)

Communication

COM*100 Introduction to Communication

3 credits

Introduces students to fundamental theories of effective communication in intrapersonal, interpersonal, and small group settings. In a workshop environment, students will practice effective oral communication strategies and offer a narrative and a group presentation. (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (Abilities Assessed: 6, 10)

COM*101 Introduction to Mass

3 credits Communication

Surveys mass communication and media literacy in today’s society by investigating forms of media (print, radio, music, movies, television, and the Internet), the messages of media (news, public relations, advertising, and entertainment), and the ethical, legal, and cultural issues surrounding media. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 10)

COM*121 Journalism I

3 credits (ENG-107) (80-141)

Students receive an introduction to news-writing, reporting, and information-gathering through completion of writing assignments and study of work done by journalists in print, television, Internet, and radio news. Attention is given to the tasks and responsibilities of persons who write for today’s varied media. Students also explore ethical questions that confront news media and those who work in news media. May be used as an English elective. Prerequisite: C or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5)

COM*154 Film Study & Appreciation

3 credits (COMM-100) (71-142)

In this introduction to American film, students learn its history, individual styles of directors, the language of the art of the moving image and film genres. Selected films will be viewed and analyzed. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX) (Ability Assessed: 1)

COM*167 Film & Video Techniques

3 credits

(1 lecture/3 studio) Introduces the basic principles of video production by providing practical experience in how to conceive, shoot, and edit short fiction and non-fiction videos. In a collaborative environment, students will learn how to create audio/visual messages to effectively communicate a narrative. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading andWriting II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) OR Introduction to College English (ENG*096) OR Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: FA/G/ HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/ CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1).

COM*172 Interpersonal Communication

3 credits (SPE-101)

Introduces the fundamental theories, principles and practices of interpersonal communication. Topics include self-concept, perception, emotions, language, non-verbal communication, listening, relational dynamics, conflict management and the impact of media and other technologies in a dynamic workshop environment. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) OR Introduction to College English (ENG*096) OR Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

COM*173 Public Speaking

3 credits (SPE-103)

Introduces students to the principles of oral communication with an emphasis on the public speaking skills needed f or academic and professional presentations. Students will apply their knowledge of the theories of effective oral communication and present a variety of speeches that appropriately use audio visual aids and outside research. In a workshop environment, students will enhance their skills in critical thinking and listening by assessing their own public speaking and providing feedback on the public speaking of others. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/ HU/LAS), 4) (Ability Assessed: 6)

COM*201 Introduction to Public Relations

3 credits

Examines public relations as a management function in corporate, government, and nonprofit organizations. Focus is given to research, development, implementation, and evaluation of a planned communication program for internal and external publics, including promotion, media relations and special events. Using both theoretical foundations and case studies, students explore the past, present, and future roles of public relations in an organization’s branding, ethics and social responsibility, and crisis management strategies. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition. (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed 2, 3)

COM*211 Screenwriting

3 credits

An introduction to the standard practices of screenwriting. Students will analyze cinematic techniques along with character and plot development in films and screenplays. Students will practice writing in an accepted screenwriting format and share their work in a workshop environment. Students will write treatments, “pitch” project proposals, and analyze storyboards that visually communicate ideas to others. This course will serve as an English elective. The Humanities Department may require submission of relevant writing sample or portfolio material. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed 1)

Computers-Aided Drafting

CAD*110 Introduction to Computer-

3 credits Aided Drafting

An introduction to the techniques of generating graphic images with computers, using AutoCAD. Topics include: overview of CAD technology, computer technology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management, two- dimensional geometric construction, symbol library creation, dimensioning, scaling, sectioning, plotting, detail and assembly drawing including tolerance studies. (Elective Type: G)

CAD*133 CAD Mechanical AutoCAD

3 credits (21-121) (CAD-121)

Introduces students to the technical drawing field. Students will use Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) for geometric construction; 3D modeling; orthographic projection; sectional views and auxiliary views; and dimensioning and tolerancing. Traditional equipment is used to reinforce pictorial sketching and drawing techniques. Prerequisite: C or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or placement into Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137). (Elective Type: G)

CAD*204 CAD 3D Architectural AutoCAD

3 credits (CAD-160)

3 lecture/1 lab Applies engineering and technological principles to the design of residential and light commercial structures. Students will create architectural drawings and three-dimensional models using AutoCAD software. This course is offered concurrently with

CAD*218 at the same time in the same classroom. It is not

possible to take both courses at the same time. Prerequisite: C- or better in CAD Mechanical AutoCAD (CAD*133).(Elective Type:G)

CAD*218 CAD 3D Mechanical AutoCAD 3 credits (CAD-150) 3 lecture/1 lab Applies engineering and technological principles to the design of everyday items, machine elements, and mechanical systems. Students will create 3D wireframe and solid machines from which engineering and production drawings will be derived using AutoCAD/CADKEY software. This course is offered concurrently with CAD*204 at the same time in the same classroom. It is not possible to take both courses at the same time. Prerequisite: C- or better in CAD Mechanical AUTOCAD (CAD*133). (Elective Type: G)

CAD*252 Architectural Design & Modeling

3 credits (CAD-161)

Enables students to develop advanced skills and understanding of the conceptual design process. Students will design mass models, building shells and cores, rendered images, landscapes, and architectural drawings. Modeling techniques are explored primarily using AutoCAD’s Architectural Desktop. Prerequisite: C- or better in CAD 3DArchitectural (CAD*204).(Elective Type:G)

CAD*268 Mechanical Design & Modeling

3 credits (CAD-151)

Enables students to develop advanced skills and understanding of the conceptual design process. Solid and parametric modeling techniques are explored primarily using AutoCAD’s Mechanical Desktop and CADKEY’s parametrics. Topics include assembly modeling, rapid prototyping, parametric and constraint-based modeling, mass property analysis, designing for manufacturing/ assembly, and data exchange standards. Prerequisite: C- or better in CAD 3D Mechanical AutoCAD (CAD*218).(Elective Type:G)

Computers—Applications

CSA*105 Introduction to

3 credits Software Applications

This hands-on introductory course is intended for students interested in learning to use the computer as a productivity tool. Course content includes the fundamentals of Windows XP, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Access, and the Internet. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

CSA*135 Spreadsheet Applications

3 credits

Introduces students to the features and functionality of Microsoft Excel. This course is ideal for beginner students and takes students to an advanced level of proficiency. Students begin by creating basic worksheets and using built in functions and formulas. Students will learn to create a chart and use advanced charting options, work with lists and tables and learn to use web queries. Students will be introduced to analytical features of Excel, macros and VBA. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

CSA*140 Database Applications

3 credits

Covers the basic functions and features of Access and takes users to an advanced level of proficiency. Initially students will learn how to design and create databases; work with tables, understand data structure, create basic queries, reports and forms. Students build on the skills to develop advanced complex queries, reporting and creating subforms. Students will create charts, use pivot tables and pivot charts. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

CSA*157 Programming for New Media

3 credits

Introduces students to programming technologies, with focus on Web-based interactions, database technologies, and emergent coding environments. This course emphasizes problem solving, project building, and new media literacy. The subject for this course changes by semester. Prerequisites: C or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126) and Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LA) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSA*260 SQL Server Administration

3 credits

Introduces students to Microsoft SQL Server. Students will gain practical experience performing database administration tasks using SQL Server. Topics such as installation, maintenance and administration, object security, query analyzer, backup and recovery will be covered. Prerequisite: C- or better in Database Design I (CSC*231). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2)

Computers—Computer Science

CSC*101 Introduction to Computers

3 credits (CIS-101) (65-101)

Provides the necessary background for and provides handson practice using popular microcomputer office applications including word processing, spreadsheets, database and presentation management. The course also covers computer concepts including hardware, software, multimedia, privacy and security, and current computing trends. Students spend approximately three hours per week on hands-on computer assignments mastering Microsoft Office. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type (in Degree Works): CONX) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 5, 6)

CSC*126 Programming Logic &

3 credits Design with Visual Basic

1.5 lecture/1.5 lab Acquaints students with the design, development, testing and documentation of Visual BASIC programs. Visual BASIC’s object oriented event driven interface is used to program sequential, conditional, and repetition structures. Students will develop multiple forms with menu and sub menu. Multiple objects and control arrays are used to gather input. Sequential data files are created and accessed in Visual BASIC programs. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*208 Advanced Visual Basic

4 credits

2 lecture/2 lab Examines how to utilize advanced features of VB.NET and the .NET Framework in order to build sophisticated, scalable, high-performing applications. Students will apply inheritance, interfaces and polymorphism in designing Visual Basic project. Students will create well-designed ASP.NET web and windows user interface. Students will learn integrating SQL, ACCESS or other database into Visual Basic with LINQ. Students also explore how to create and consume WCF services to build distributed systems. Finally, students will learn how to deploy windows and ASP.NET applications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*213 Object-Oriented Programming

3 credits Using C++

1.5 lecture/1.5 lab Introduces students to object oriented programming in Microsoft’s .net environment. Topics covered include basic principles of programming using C++, algorithmic and procedural problem solving, program design and development, basic data types, control structures, functions, arrays, pointers, and introduction to classes for programmer-defined data types. Prerequisites: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*214 Advanced C++ Programming

3 credits (CIS-210) (65-290)

1.5 lecture/1.5 lab Introduction to object-oriented programming in C++, focusing on advanced programming and data structures. C++ syntax and style are taught in the context of using object-oriented methods to achieve reusability, adaptability and reliability. Importance is placed on the features of C++ that support abstract data types, inheritance, and polymorphism. Students will learn to apply the process of data abstraction and class design. Also covered are aggregate data types, advanced pointer usage, linked lists, stacks, and queues. Prerequisite: C- or better in C Programming (CSC*210) or Programming with Object-Oriented C++ (CSC*215). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*220 Object-Oriented Programming

Using JAVA

3 credits (CIS-214) 1.5 lecture/1.5 lab The design of high-quality, object-oriented software. Problemsolving, utilizing applets and applications will be emphasized. Software engineering principles involving class hierarchy, arrays of objects, collections, encapsulation, and packages will be explored. The impact and significance of the Internet and World Wide Web with respect for JAVA will be demonstrated. Prerequisite: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*221 Advanced JAVA Programming I

3 credits (CIS-215)

Introduces advanced features of JAVA. Topics include collection classes, searching and sorting, multithreading, parallel processing and database programming. Also delves deeper into data structure and file input and output. Students will learn a powerful language for cross-platform, object oriented programming. Prerequisite: C- or better in Object Oriented Programming using JAVA (CSC*220) or Object-Oriented Programming in JAVA (CSC*226). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*231 Database Design I

3 credits (CIS-252)

Introduces students to the design, implementation, and management of database systems. A variety of database models will be presented including relational, entity-relationship and object-oriented. Topics such as normalization, Structured Query Language (SQL), distributed databases, client server systems and data warehouses will be covered. Students will have the opportunity to design and implement a small database system. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introduction to Computers (CSC*101) OR Database Applications (CSA*140). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

CSC*250 Systems Analysis and Design

3 credits (CIS-221) (65-351)

The principles of systems analysis and design, and a basic framework for an analytical method, are presented. The student is given practical business problems and is guided in the analysis and design of automated solutions. Prerequisite: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126); Corequisite: Database Design I (CSC*231). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CSC*292 Practicum in Computer Science

3 credits

Students will complete an 8-10 hour per week industry work experience in a computer-related position. Students will be supervised by assigned personnel at the field site and by the college instructor. Hours are arranged by mutual consent of the student and employer. Students also participate in oncampus seminars that focus on timely employment-related topics, maintain a weekly log of on-the-job activities, and critique the practicum experience in a final project. Students will complete both an assessment ePortfolio and a showcase ePortfolio as a major component of the course. Prerequisites: C- or better in Database Design I (CSC*231), Systems Analysis & Design (CSC*250), Operating Systems (CST*210), Network Essentials I (CST*130), and permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 5)

CSC*298 Special Topics in

Computer Science

3 credits (CIS-260) (CIS-199) (65-560) Topics of current interest in the field of computer science are covered. It is recommended that this course be taken during the latter portion of the student’s matriculation and may be repeated (under different topics) for no more than six semester hours. Prerequisites: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design withVisual Basic (CSC*126), OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G)

Computers—Technology

CST*130 Network Essentials I

3 credits (CIS-225)

Introduces students to the underlying concepts of data communications, telecommunications, and networking. Provides a general overview of computer networks, and focuses on terminology and current networking environment technologies. Topics to be covered include network topologies, protocols, architectures, components, and operating systems. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

CST*150 Web Design and Development I

3 credits (CIS-105)

Designed primarily for the CIS student, this course will introduce the student to the rudimentary concepts and applications of the HTML, XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, XML and JavaScript to produce and publish both static and interactive Web sites. Students will produce a Web site that will integrate these techniques in both client- and server-side applications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*156 Computer Forensics & Investigations

3 credits

This course introduces students to the field of computer forensics. Topics to be covered include data acquisition, analyzing evidence, and investigations. Students will complete hands-on computer-based exercises and lab simulations. Students will learn how to work with different operating systems so that forensic extraction is relevant for legal review or to be used as testimonial evidence. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*163 Windows Server Administration

3 credits (CIS-235)

Introduces the student to Microsoft Windows Server. Students will learn the basics of installing, administrating and maintaining a Windows Server implementation. Administration of user and group accounts, Active Directory, network protocols and services such as virtual private networking, Routing and Remote Access Service, DHCP, DNS, backup, recovery and disaster planning will be covered. Prerequisites: Network Essentials I (CST*130) and Operating Systems (CST*210). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*193 Introduction to TCP/IP

3 credits (CIS-245)

Students learn the underlying applications, components, and protocols of TCP/IP and its necessary link to the Internet, and how to identify TCP/IP layers, components, and functions. Navigation tools, TCP/IP services, and troubleshooting methodologies are also discussed. Prerequisite: C- or better in Network Essentials I (CST*130). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*201 Introduction to Management

3 credits Information Systems

Provides the background necessary for understanding the role of information systems in organizations and f or using computer tools and technology in solving business problems. Topics include organizational and technical foundations of information systems, theory of information systems design, fundamental database principles, network systems, e-commerce and supply chain systems, information network security management, and meeting global challenges. Microsoft Excel, Access, PowerPoint and Project are used to demonstrate selected topical concepts. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading/Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type (in Degree Works): CONX) (Ability Assessed: 5)

CST*210 Operating Systems

3 credits (CIS-231) (65-451)

Provides a theoretical and practical study of today’s operating systems. This course will analyze what operating systems are, what they do, how they do it, and how they compare with each other. Topics such as memory management, process management, device management, and user interfaces will be explored. Prerequisite: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*230 Network Essentials II

3 credits

This course builds on the knowledge gained in Network Essentials I. Topics covered will include network security, wireless and optical networking, voice over IP, and designing and maintaining campus and industrial networks. Handson network simulation software will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Network Essentials I (CST*130). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*264 Unix/Linux System

Administration

3 credits (CIS-240) Introduces the Unix/Linux environment and its history. Students will learn the basics of installing, administrating, and maintaining a Linux implementation. Topics such as the shell, fault tolerance, managing system resources, backup and recovery will be presented. Prerequisite: C- or better in Network Essentials I (CST*130). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CST*270 Network Security Fundamentals

3 credits

Introduces students to the subject of network security. Topics include security models, authentication, attacks, infrastructure devices, intrusion detection, and the basics of cryptography along with physical security and disaster recovery. This course emphasizes preparing the student for the CompTIA Security+ certification. Prerequisite: C- or better in Windows Server Administration (CST*163) or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2, 3)

CST*298 Special Topics in

3 credits Computer Technology

Topics of current interest in the field of computer technology are covered. It is recommended that this course be taken during the latter portion of the student’s matriculation and may be repeated (under different topics) for no more than six semester hours. Prerequisites: C- or better in Programming Logic and Design withVisual Basic (CSC*126); OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G)

Construction Technology

CTC*106 Blueprint Reading

3 credits

1.5 lecture/1.5 lab Provides the fundamentals of blueprint reading for estimating and construction. Topics include construction methods, construction math, lines and symbols, abbreviations, notations, using architectural and engineering scales, dimensioning, basic sketching and various types of plans – site, architectural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, structural, and shop drawings and specifications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ESL*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162) or placement into Composition (ENG*101);AND C- or better in Prealgebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) OR placement into credit-level mathematics or appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

Criminal Justice

CJS*101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 credits (CJ-101) (35-121)

A survey of the evolution, principles, concepts, and practices of law enforcement. The structure and organization of our courts is examined with regard to the administration of criminal justice. Topics include the American model of criminal justice, police and the community, police and the Constitution, and the American legal system. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 4)

CJS*102 Introduction to Corrections

3 credits (CJ-102) (35-101)

Study of the history, philosophy and evolution of corrections. An examination is included of the processes used by our courts, which result in sentencing of offenders: probation, parole, treatment programs and rehabilitation models. A study of punishment is undertaken and the functions that our jails and prisons provide are reviewed. Topics include plea bargaining, speedy trial, sentencing, prisoners’ rights, victimization, and juvenile justice. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

CJS*105 Introduction to Law Enforcement

3 credits (CJ-100) (35-111)

A comprehensive examination of the public safety and lawenforcement functions of government in a modern society. Considered are the evolution, history and philosophy of the law-enforcement function; the role of the police in a democratic and pluralistic society; police accountability, corruption and deviance; police operational principles and practices; and current problems confronting the police in their relationship to the community they serve. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 6)

CJS*106 Introduction to Homeland Security

3 credits

Introduces students to the vocabulary and important components of Homeland Security. The importance of the agencies associated with Homeland Security and their interrelated duties and relationships will be discussed. Historical events that impact Homeland Security will be explored as well as state, national and international laws impacting Homeland Security. The most critical threats confronting Homeland Security will be examined. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 4)

CJS*120 Police and the Community

3 credits (CJ-140) (35-253)

An investigation of the numerous and complex factors involved in human relations in policing and police management. Students will also examine police practices that have resulted in disputed public responses. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 3)

CJS*155 Probation Practices and Policies

3 credits (CJ-138)

A comprehensive examination of probation services, current practices, and policies for both juvenile and adult offenders. This course will consider local, state, and federal models for the delivery of probation services, as well as innovative and experimental approaches. Students will explore the functions and duties of probation officers, including pre-sentence investigations, risk assessments, strategies for supervision and counseling, community resource development, supervision of sexual offenders, addiction services, and Alternative to Incarceration Programs. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101). (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

CJS*158 Intelligence Analysis and

3 credits Security Management

Examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, manmade disasters, and natural disasters. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CJS*211 Criminal Law I

3 credits (CJ-231) (35-231)

Introduction to the theory, history, and purpose of criminal law. Included is a study of offenses such as those against the person, against habitation and occupancy, and against property. The Connecticut Penal Code is discussed. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) AND C- or better in US History I (HIS*201) or American Government (POL*111). (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

CJS*213 Evidence and Criminal Procedure

3 credits (CJ-221) (35-232)

A study of criminal procedure as applied to arrest, force, search, and seizure, this course considers the evaluation of evidence and proof with regard to kind, degree, admissibility, competence, and weight. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101)AND C- or better in US HistoryI (HIS*201) ORAmerican Government (POL*111.(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CJS*220 Criminal Investigation

3 credits (CJ-122) (35-234)

A study of the theory and application of criminal investigation beyond the crime scene. The development of information sources, identification by witnesses, interviews and interrogation, admissions, and case preparation are considered. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101),AND C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) OR permission of Program Coordinator.) (Elective Type:G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 3)

CJS*223 Fraud Investigation

3 credits (CJ-130) (35-235)

Introduction to techniques and methods used in fraud investigation. Includes a review of general laws pertaining to specific types of credit card fraud, corporate fraud, trick and device, theft by false pretenses, and evidence required f or prosecution. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101), AND C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) or permission of the Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 3)

CJS*240 Correctional Administration

3 credits (CJ-111) (35-261)

Provides students with an understanding of the correctional organization, the administrative process, and supervision and management in the correctional setting. Topics include values and ethics, policies and procedures, legal issues for employees, human resources, leadership, power and influence. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice or Introduction to Corrections. (Elective Type: G/LAS)

CJS*243 Institutional Treatment

of the Offender

3 credits (CJ-151) (35-130) The management of the offender in an institutional environment is examined. From admission to release, the offender is processed through a system that addresses and balances the security and treatment needs of each individual. These needs and the system are studied in terms of current correctional approaches. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101), and C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) or Introduction to Corrections (CJS*102).) (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

CJS*244 Community Based Corrections

3 credits (CJ-152) (35-251)

The relationship between institutional confinement and community-based supervision is examined. Probation and parole programs are examined in terms of organization and administration. Includes a study of programs and activities that are rehabilitative and community reintegration. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101), and C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) or Introduction to Corrections (CJS*102).) (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

CJS*255 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice

3 credits (CJ-298) (35-271)

Provides students with an understanding of the necessity of high standards of ethical and moral behavior in our justice process. Areas of focus include ethical and moral issues in personal, social, and criminal justice contexts. Comprehensive coverage is achieved through focus on law enforcement, legal practice, sentencing, corrections, research, crime control policy and philosophical issues. Prerequisite: C or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) AND Introduction to Corrections (CJS*102), and C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG* 093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 3)

CJS*281 Transportation & Border Security

3 credits

Provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as different methods employed to address these challenges. The course covers a time period from post September 11, 2001 to the present. The course explores topics associated with border security and security for transportation infrastructure, to include: seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges, rail lines, pipelines, and buses. The course will include an exploration of technological solutions employed to enhance security of borders and transportation systems. Students will be required to discuss the legal, economic, political, and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. The course provides students with a knowledge level understanding of the variety of challenges inherent in transportation and border security. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intelligence Analysis and Security Management (CJS*158). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

CJS*290 Practicum in Criminal Justice

3 credits (CJ-251) (99-105)

Supervised placement with a public, private or non-profit organization that provides services related to the criminal justice system. Students will be required to complete 80 hours of field work and submit multiple monthly written assignments or complete a research project with permission of the coordinator. Open to students in Criminal Justice Programs. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Criminal Justice Program and permission of the Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,8, 9, 10, 11)

CJS*294 Contemporary Issues

in Criminal Justice

3 credits (CJ-211) (35-221) The effects of contemporary trends upon the police, the courts, and the correctional processes are studied. Emphasis is on research and methodology as useful tools in criminal justice planning. Topics include secrecy and the police, court plea bargaining, and prisoners’ rights. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101), and C- or better in Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJS*101) or Introduction to Corrections (CJS*102). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

Dental Assisting

DAS*130 Dental Materials f or 2 credits the Dental Assistant

1 lecture/2 lab

Provides the knowledge and skills required of the dental assistant in the preparation and application of dental materials. Laboratory exercises will compliment the didactic theory through manipulation of dental materials. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). Co-requisites: Dental Assisting Concepts (DAS*115), Oral Anatomy & Essentials of Radiography (DAS*125), and First Year Experience (CSS-101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

DAS*140 Essential Chairside Functions

4 credits for the Dental Assistant

3 lecture/7 clinic Provides basic knowledge and skill application for general chairside dental assisting procedures including professionalism, infection control, recording of patient medical and dental history, and data collection in all aspects of dentistry. Student didactic and clinical activities are coordinated to become proficient and efficient in general dentistry chairside performance and be familiar with the different dental specialties. . Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162)or placement into Composition (ENG*101), AND C or better in Basic Medical Support (HLT*112); Co-requisite: Matriculation in the Dental Assisting Certificate Program; Other Requirements: Current certification in CPR/First Aid. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2).

DAS*142 Dental Assisting Research Seminar

1 credit

Dental Assisting Research Seminar provides students with the tools necessary for success in the dental assisting program and college environment. Students learn and apply college study skills, expand their civic awareness by collaboratively researching and presenting an issue related to active citizenship, and acquire strategies to help them cope with the academic and personal demands unique to the dental assisting program. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162) or placement into Composition (ENG*101); Co-requisite: Matriculation in the Dental Assisting Certificate Program;Other Requirements: Current certification in CPR/First Aid. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

DAS*144 Preventive Dentistry

3 credits

An introduction to the prevention and management of oral diseases including nutrition and pharmacology as they relate to dental assisting procedures. Prerequisite: Placement into Composition (ENG*101); Co-requisite: Matriculation in the Dental Assisting Certificate Program;Other Requirements: Current certification in CPR/First Aid. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

DAS*146 Oral Anatomy for the

3 credits Dental Assistant

2 lecture/2 seminar Provides an in-depth investigation of the development of the orofacial complex through the study of oral histology and em-bryology. The exploration of facial/cranial osteological structures and landmarks gives a foundation to the study of the gross anatomy of the hard and soft structures of the head and neck region including muscular, circulatory, nervous, lymphatic, glandular systems, and tooth morphology. Prerequisite: C or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162) or placement into Composition (ENG*101); Corequisite: Matriculation in the Dental Assisting Certificate Program; Other Requirements:Current certification in CPR/First Aid.(Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 8)

DAS*148 Principles of Radiation f or 3 credits the Dental Assistant

Focuses on the foundations of radiography, radiographic

equipment and safety. Legal issues, quality assurance and infection prevention is also emphasized. Prerequisite: C or better in Basic Medical Support (HLT*112). (Elective Type: G)

DAS*164 Radiography for Theory & Practice

3 credits for the Dental Assistant

2 lecture/3 lab Provides an in-depth study of principles of the X-ray production and radiation physics, biology, and safety. The learned concepts in quality assurance; radiographic image identification and mounting; and patient management are applied in the study of intraoral and extraoral techniques. Prerequisites: C or better in Principles of Radiation for the Dental Assistant (DAS*148), Oral Anatomy for the Dental Assistant (DAS*146), Dental Materials for the Dental Assistant (DAS*130), and Essential Chairside Functions for the DA (DAS*140). (Elective Type: G)

DAS*170 Practice Management, Law and

2 credits Ethics for the Dental Assistant

Examination of current biomedical issues related to ethical decision making, employee rights and responsibilities, and standards related to dental practice management. The Connecticut State Dental Practice Act is compared with other practice acts in various states. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Dental Assisting Program.(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 3)

DAS*172 Dental Assisting Clinical

7 credits Externship Experience

1 lecture/1 seminar/21 clinic Students gain clinical experience assisting a dentist as an integral part of the educational program designed to perfect students’ competence in performing chairside assisting functions. Students must have a minimum of 300 hours of clinical experience. A daily record of professional activities will be kept by the student and provided to the course instructor for review. Lecture and seminars will be conducted weekly with a focus and discussion on the clinical experience and preparation for Dental Assisting National Board General Chairside Exam. Prerequisite: C or better in all previous coursework in the Dental Assisting program; Co-requisite: Practice, Management, Law and Ethics (DAS*170); Other Requirements:Current certification DANB RHS & CPR/First Aid. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

Dental Hygiene

DHY*207 Standards, Ethics and Jurisprudence for the DH

2 credits

(DE-107/DED*107/DHY*107)(61-042) Examination of current biomedical issues related to ethical decision making, employee rights and responsibilities, and standards related to dental hygiene practice management. The Connecticut State Dental Practice Act is compared with other practice acts in various states. Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 3)

DHY*209 Fundamentals of

3 credits Dental Hygiene Theory

3 lecture hours/1 seminar hour Presents a comprehensive theoretical introduction to dental hygiene and is designed to familiarize the student with the concept of total client/patient care. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Dental Hygiene program. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 5)

DHY*210 Fundamentals of

1 credit Dental Hygiene Clinic

6 clinic hours Presents a comprehensive clinical introduction to dental hygiene care designed to familiarize students with the concept of total patient care via practical application and self assessment. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Dental Hygiene program. Co-requisites: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory (DHY*209), Diagnostic Radiography for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*212),Dental Materials for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*225), AND Histology and Oral Anatomy for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*228). (Elective Type: G)

DHY*212 Diagnostic Radiography

3 credits for the Dental Hygienist

2 lecture hours/3 lab hours Concentrates on production, evaluation and interpretation of intraoral and panoramic radiographs, radiation safety and biology. Radiographic competency must be met in the production and evaluation of diagnostic full mouth series in the laboratory setting as well as on a client/patient. Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Dental Hygiene Program. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2).

DHY*225 Dental Materials f or 2 credits the Dental Hygienist

1 lecture/2 lab (DH-/DHY*106)

Provides a comprehensive study of dental materials, including the properties and manipulation, biomechanical function, physical and chemical properties, and biocompatibility of dental materials. An emphasis will be placed on those materials and skills utilized by the dental hygiene practitioner for dental hygiene diagnosis and treatment planning. Critical analysis of current evidence based literature will be an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Dental Hygiene program. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

DHY*228 Histology & Oral Anatomy

3 credits for the Dental Hygienist

3 lecture/2 seminar Provides a comprehensive study of microscopic morphology of the head, neck and oral tissues, anatomy of the head and neck, including embryology and structures and functions of the human dentition. This study is specific and relevant to the practice of dental hygiene for utilization in skill development, radiographic interpretation, and client education. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the Dental Hygiene program. (Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 8)

DHY*233 Oral Medicine and Pathology

2 credits (DH-/DHY*113) (61-022)

2 lecture Introduces the student to the results of local, as well as systemic conditions that have oral manifestations. The student will become familiar with the disease processes that impact patient care. Prerequisites: C or better in Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory (DHY*209), Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Clinic (DHY*210), AND Histology and Oral Anatomy for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*228). (Elective Type: G)

DHY*239 Dental Hygiene II Theory

2 credits 2 lecture/1 seminar

Presents the principles and assessment of oral health, dental hygiene care planning, treatment methods, and the preventive measures employed against dental disease. The course establishes the scientific principles of disease prevention and focus is on instrumentation techniques. An overview of dental specialties is also included. Prerequisites: C or better in Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory (DHY*209), Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Clinic (DHY*210), Diagnostic Radiography for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*212),AND Histology and Oral Anatomy for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*228). (Note: This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240).) (Elective Type: G)

DHY*240 Dental Hygiene II Clinic

2 credits/12 clinic

Clinical application of principles and assessment of oral health, dental hygiene care planning, treatment methods, and preventive measures employed against dental disease. Student self-assessment of clinical skills is required. Prerequisites: C or better in Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory (DHY*209), Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Clinic (DHY*210), Diagnostic Radiography for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*212), and Histology and Oral Anatomy for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*228). (Note: This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239).) (Elective Type: G)

DHY*259 Dental Hygiene III Theory

3 credits 2 lecture/1 seminar

A comprehensive approach to client assessment, education, care planning and evaluation of delivery of care is provided. The focus is on dental health science with an emphasis on the care of clients who are medically compromised. Utilizing case studies, the student will be required to undertake an evidenced-based decision-making process regarding delivery of care. Prerequisites: C or better in both Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239) AND Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240).(Note:This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260).) (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

DHY*260 Dental Hygiene III Clinic

3 credits/14 clinic

A comprehensive approach to client care including assessment, education, care planning, treatment methods and evaluation of delivery of care is provided. Client care is provided in numerous clinical settings in Connecticut. Prerequisites: C or better in both Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239) AND Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240). (Note:This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene IIITheory (DHY*259).) (Elective Type: G)

DHY*262 Periodontics

2 credits (DH-/DHY*202) (61-023)

2 lecture Focus is on the recognition of clinical, biological, and histological characteristics of the periodontium classification of periodontal disease; the role of microorganism; the role of local factors in the etiology of periodontal disease; and the principles of therapy. Prerequisites: C or better in Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239), Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240), AND Histology and Oral Anatomy for the Dental Hygienist (DHY*228). (Elective Type: G)

DHY*264 Pharmacology

3 credits (DH-/DHY*204) (61-032)

3 lecture Acquaints dental hygiene students with medications used in modern dental practice. Focus is on various drugs, their modes of action, and their principal uses. Prerequisites: C or better in both Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO*211) and Anatomy Physiology II (BIO*212), AND successful completion of all pri or dental courses with a grade of 75 (C) or better. (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 8) medications used in modern dental practice. Focus is on various drugs, their modes of action, and their principal uses. Prerequisites: C in Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239) and C in Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 8)

DHY*267 Community Oral Health I

2 credits 2 lecture/4 community

Provides an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, materials, technology, principles and practices in oral public health promotion and disease prevention. This course provides students with a broad understanding of the health care system and the social, political, cultural, behavioral and economic forces influencing that system. Students will be introduced to their role as a community health promoter through a variety of didactic and service-learning experiences. Prerequisites: C or better in both Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239) AND Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240).(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed:7)

DHY*269 Dental Hygiene Research

1 credit Seminar I

1 seminar Provides an introduction to research and its relationship to theory development of the dental hygiene knowledge base, furthering its translation into clinical and community practice. This course focuses on research concepts and methodologies needed to interpret and critically review research studies and articles. Prerequisites: C or better in Dental Hygiene II Theory (DHY*239) AND Dental Hygiene II Clinic (DHY*240). Corequisites: Dental Hygiene III Theory (DHY*259), Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

DHY*275 Pain Control and Local

Anesthesia for the DH

3 credits 2 lecture/1 clinic This course presents the basic science and dental science foundations of clinical local anesthesia in preparation f or Connecticut State Certification for administration of local anesthesia by dental hygienists. Students will learn to perform safe, effective and proper techniques of intraoral pain control utilizing local anesthetic administration on a student–client partner. Emphasis is placed on client evaluation for predicting and preventing complications. Prerequisites: Matriculating second year dental hygiene student. Current certification in CPR for the Professional Rescuer/Health Care Provider and AED from the Red Cross or American Heart Association, proof of Hepatitis B vaccination, TB antigen test within one year (PPD). NOTE: Each student MUST serve as a client for another student. Student must be proficient with online format for the didactic component of the curriculum.Attendance at all clinical sessions is mandatory. Faculty recommendation to register is required. Students must complete online and pass with 80% in order to continue into clinical sessions. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

DHY*279 Dental Hygiene IV Theory

2 credits/2 lecture

Presents a complete, comprehensive integration of the student’s basic science and dental science education as it relates to the theory of assessment, education, treatment planning, delivery of care, and evaluation in the contemporary practice of dental hygiene. Prerequisites: C or better in both Dental Hygiene III Theory (DHY*259) and Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260). (Note:This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene IV Clinic (DHY*280).) (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

DHY*280 Dental Hygiene IV Clinic

3 credits/14 clinic

Presents a complete, comprehensive integration of the student’s basic science and dental science education as it relates to the clinical application of assessment, education, treatment planning, delivery of care, and evaluation in the contemporary practice of dental hygiene. Student self-assessment of clinical performance is required. Prerequisites: C or better in Dental Hygiene III Theory (DHY*259), Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260), Periodontics (DHY*262), Pharmacology (DHY*264), Dental Hygiene Research Seminar I (DHY*269).Note:This course must be taken concurrently with Dental Hygiene IVTheory (DHY*279).(Elective Type:G)

DHY*287 Community Oral Health II

3 credits

2 lecture/4 community Provides a continuation of Community Oral Health I. Principles of public health practice will be emphasized using a community based process for health promotion and disease prevention activities and the application of research methodology. Prerequisites: C or better in Dental Hygiene III Theory (DHY*259),Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260),Dental Hygiene Research Seminar I (DHY*269), and Community Oral Health I (DHY*267). (Elective Type: G)

DHY*289 Dental Hygiene

1 credit Research Seminar II

1 seminar Provides a continuation of Dental Hygiene Research Seminar I focusing on application of the evidence-based decision making-process utilizing current research findings and clinical practice guidelines to address the research question under consideration. Prerequisites: C or better in Dental Hygiene III Theory (DHY*259), Dental Hygiene III Clinic (DHY*260), Dental Hygiene Research Seminar I (DHY*269), Community Oral Health I (DHY*267). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

Digital Arts

DGA*160 3-D Digital Animation I

3 credits (74-220)

2 lecture/2 studio An introductory course in three-dimensional computer animation. The student will learn key framing, motion paths, creating a preview animation, camera functions, lighting techniques, modifiers and deformers. A basic short animation will be executed from the ground up using a constructed scene based on a storyboard working with variable elements within a scene and creating a workflow. Prerequisites: C- or better in 3-D Computer Modeling (GRA*275) AND Drawing II (ART*112). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 1)

DGA*161 3-D Computer Animation II

3 credits (74-220)

2 lecture/2 studio Takes the student to a higher level of professional animation by introducing character animation, audio bytes, UV mapping, scripting, lighting and atmospheric effects, more detailed motion paths, and parenting set-ups. The students will produce a finished animated sequence that uses titles and credits along with a storyboard and script. Detailed texture mapping and rendering will be part of the course. There will be one collaborative project during the semester. Prerequisites: C- or better in 3-D Digital Animation I (DGA*160).(Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 1)

Early Childhood Education

ECE*101 Introduction to Early

Childhood Education

3 credits (ED-104) Designed to acquaint students with the field of early care and education. Foundations of early childhood education, an overview of curriculum content, and significant aspects of child growth and development will be presented. Twenty hours of observation and participation at the Early Childhood Center of Tunxis Community College, or another approved site, is a requirement. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading andWriting I (ENG*065); or placement into Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECE*103 Creative Experiences/Children

3 credits (ED-102)

Exploration of a wide variety of creative media suitable f or use with young children. Students will experiment with and utilize techniques and methods appropriate for working with young children. Emphasis is given to creative experiences as they impact on the development of young children. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065); or placement into Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 6)

ECE*106 Music and Movement for Children

3 credits (ED-105)

Introduction to a variety of musical activities for young children, including rhythmic play, basic rhythmic instruments, songs, and circle games. Methods to encourage child participation in activities will be stressed. Music and movement as an important aspect in the development of the whole child—physically, socially, emotionally and mentally—will be explored. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065); or placement into Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ECE*109 Science & Math for Children

3 credits (ED-109)

The focus is on mathematics and science for young children. Students will acquire knowledge of materials and methods f or integrating math and science concept development into the curriculum. Emphasis will be on understanding these areas from a child-development perspective. Active participation working with children will be required. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065); or placement into Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), and C- or better in Pre-Algebra & ElementaryAlgebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or placement into Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5) Reading andWriting I (ENG*065) or placement into Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) OR Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) OR Introduction to College English (ENG*096) OR Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162)AND C- or better in Prealgebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) OR placement into any credit-level mathematics course.

ECE*141 Infant/Toddler Growth

and Development

3 credits (ED-106) Growth and development of infants and toddlers are explored. Students learn developmentally-appropriate care-giving practices, based on the emotional, social, physical, cognitive, language, and creative areas of development. Topics include curriculum for infants and toddlers; health and safety issues; creating environments; and parents as partners in the care and nurturing of young children. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065) or placement into Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

ECE*176 Health, Safety and Nutrition

3 credits (ED-108)

Helps students realize the importance of the relationship between adequate health, safety, and nutrition practices, and the young child’s well-being. Development of age-appropriate curriculum and activities to foster lifelong favorable habits and attitudes will be addressed. Students will participate in creating healthy snacks and meal menus following USDA Guidelines for Meeting Nutrition Standards. Developmentally-appropriate nutrition experiences for young children will also be created by students. Prerequisite: C- or better in in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065), or placement into Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECE*180 Child Development Associate

Credential Preparation Course

3 credits (ED-180) Designed for child-care providers who are preparing for their Child Development Associate (CDA) credential, through the Council of Early Childhood Professional Recognition, under its present requirements. This course will focus on the CDA competency skills and the CDA functional areas,. The course will assist students in the preparation of their CDA resource file and the final assessment process. Prerequisites: C- or better in both Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE*101) AND Health, Safety, and Nutrition (ECE*176) or permission of the Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECE*206 Administration and Supervision of

Early Childhood Programs

3 credits (ED-206) Designed to examine the multi-dimensional role of the early childhood program director/administrator. Emphasis will be on the areas of effective leadership, selection, supervision, and evaluation of staff members, program development and appropriate practices, the budgeting process and fiscal management, food and health services, laws and regulations concerning state childcare licensing, and parent involvement. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECE*210 Observation, Participation

and Seminar

3 credits (ED-248) Increases objectivity in observing and interpreting of children’s behavior, and increase the awareness of normal patterns of behavior. Students will visit, observe, and participate in an early childhood setting, approved by the instructor, for two hours per week. Weekly seminar sessions with the instructor will be held to discuss and plan for the children’s learning needs. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator AND C- or better in Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE*101), Child Development (PSY*203), and Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

ECE*215 The Exceptional Learner

3 credits (ED-217)

Exposes students who will work in an educational setting to laws, guidelines, and procedures related to instruction f or special education students; assists educators in understanding the needs of students with exceptionalities; and helps enable the identification of characteristics, issues, and instructional considerations for students with disabilities. In addition to classwork, there is a field observation/experience requirement. This course fulfills requirements toward a certificate from the State of Connecticut for the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND General Psychology I (PSY*111), OR equivalent as determined by department chairperson. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

ECE*231 Early Language and

Literacy Development

3 credits (ED-231) An introduction to language and literacy development in the young child. Students will explore the early childhood language arts curriculum including speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. The teacher’s role and methods of creating a literacy-rich environment that engages children in creative, developmentally-appropriate language arts experiences will be examined. Students will create plans and materials for use with children. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ECE*241 Methods and Techniques f or 3 credits Infant/Toddler Care

Introduces students to the concept of infant/toddler

education. Presents theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to create an infant/toddler curriculum in an inclusive environment. Reviews the development of the child from birth to 36 months in areas of attachment, perception, mot or skills, cognition, language, emotions, and social skills. Several curriculum models will be explored. Students will learn ways to interact with children under three through studies of learning games, language activities, music, movement, and dramatic play. Developmentally appropriate toys and books will be reviewed. In addition to classwork, there is a field observation/experience requirement. Prerequisite: C- or better in Infant/Toddler Growth and Development (ECE*141) OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

ECE*275 Child, Family, and School Relations

3 credits (ED-175)

An in-depth look at the child, the family, and the relationship between the school and the family. An understanding of and the guidance of child behavior will be examined, as well as how to communicate with families. Students will identify today’s families, and how schools can develop working relationships with the family. Prerequisites: C- or better in Child Development (PSY*203) OR Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECE*295 Student Teaching Practicum

6 credits (ED-210)

Provides 220 hours of supervised student teaching in the Tunxis Early Childhood Center, on campus, or in an approved NAEYC-accredited cooperating early childhood program in the community. Student teachers will apply child development theory to a learning environment and work with children under close supervision. Student teachers will plan, organize, implement, and evaluate classroom learning experiences and attend a weekly seminar for discussions of issues in Early Childhood Education and their student teaching experience. Special projects are included. Prerequisites: Program enrollment, permission of the Program Coordinator, and a grade of C- or better in all of the listed courses - Introduction to Early Childhood Education (ECE*101), Creative Experiences/Children (ECE*103), Health, Safety, Nutrition (ECE*176), Observation, Participation & Seminar (ECE*210), Exceptional Learner (ECE*215), and Early Language & Literacy Development (ECE*231).(Elective Type:G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

Earth Science

EAS*102 Earth Science

3 credits (SCI-113) (55-105)

An introductory overview of our planet, earth, including important aspects of physical and historical geology: rock types, minerals, plate tectonics and estimates of the age of the earth, land forms, ground water, and erosion; physical oceanography: oceans, currents and water masses; meteorology: weather systems, wind-ocean interactions and climatology; astronomy: planets and moons in our solar system and the sun. This course qualifies as a science elective for non-science majors. Field trips may be required. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

EAS*106 Natural Disasters

3 credits

This course provides an introduction to the causes, occurrence and consequences of natural disasters. Students will analyze the physical causes as well as the distribution and frequency of disasters such as earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, floods, mass wasting, severe weather, tsunamis, wildfires, and extraterrestrial impacts. Case studies will include local and regional examples of historical and recent disasters. The course will focus on naturally occurring disasters, but will also consider the role of human activities in both contributing to and mitigating natural disasters. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX)

Economics

ECN*101 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 credits (ECO-101) (33-101)

Introduction to aggregate economic phenomena and processes, and fundamental economic concepts of supply and demand, exchange and specialization, and international trade. Topics include national income accounting, the circular flow of money, income and spending, the monetary system of the economy, unemployment and inflation, determination of national income and employment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth and development. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101);and C- or better in Pre-Algebra and ElementaryAlgebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) OR placement into credit level mathematics.(Elective Type:G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

ECN*102 Principles of Microeconomics

3 credits (ECO-102) (33-102)

Markets and determination of price and output in product, resource, and financial markets are studied. Topics include consumer and producer theory, demand and supply elasticities, international finance, competition and monopoly, functional and individual income distribution, poverty, and government intervention in markets. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101);and C- or better in Pre-Algebra and ElementaryAlgebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) OR placement into credit level mathematics.(Elective Type:G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

Electrical Engineering Technology

EET*103 Fundamentals of Electricity

4 credits

Basic electricity is surveyed including DC and AC circuits, Ohm’s Law, analysis of series, parallel circuits and series-parallel circuits, theory and operations of transformers, capacitors, and inductors and their analysis and inclusion in electrical circuits. Three hour lecture, three hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139).(Elective Type:G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EET*132 Electronics

4 credits (TC-213)

Surveys solid state devices and analog circuits, including diodes, transistors, amplifiers, filters, rectifiers, regulated power supplies, and control devices. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in Fundamentals of Electricity (EET*103). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EET*142 Electric & Power System

Fundamentals

3 credits (21-114)(TC-114) Forms of energy and the conversion processes employed by industry to increase its value and usefulness are surveyed. Laboratory experiences include experimentation with various energy converters. Open to all students. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EET*252 Digital Electronics

4 credits/3 lecture/3 lab

Combinational and sequential logic circuits are covered. Topics include: number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, MSI and LSI circuits, AC /DC converters, and other related topics. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to construct, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment. The course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisites: C- or better in Programming for Engineers (EGR*115), and C- or better in College Algebra (MAT*172) or Precalculus (MAT*186). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

Energy

NRG*122 Commercial HVAC

3 credits Systems & Analysis

2 lecture/2 lab Familiarity with and the analysis of building HVAC systems is a basic necessity for commercial energy auditors. Students will gain an understanding of the operation and application of various types of commercial HVAC Systems by touring mechanical rooms around campus to identify different parts of the commercial HVAC system (boilers, chillers, air handlers). Hands-on lab enables students to analyze the operation, efficiency, and programming of these systems. Data logging may be included for calculations and analysis. Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Systems (ARC*240); Co-requisite: Introductory Physics (PHY*110). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

NRG*123 Energy Efficiency Methods

3 credits

A systems approach is used to analyze the input, output, and efficiency of commonplace energy conversion devices. Included are motors, fans, pumps, heat engines, domestic hot water heaters, furnaces, boilers, refrigeration devices, and heat pumps. In so doing students (1) become fluent in the use of the many different units used to denote and measure energy/power (2) learn what quantities need to be measured to determine energy/power in different systems (3) determine the energy/cost savings associated with different efficiency improvement strategies. Prerequisite: C- or better in Environmental Systems (ARC*240) or permission of Program Coordinator; Co-requisite: Introductory Physics (PHY*110). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

NRG*124 Energy Control Strategies

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab An introduction to basic control theory as it relates to building HVAC systems. Integration of various HVAC concepts and control systems facilitates the completion of an energy savings calculation project. Topics include building system control theory and devices, including electric, pneumatic, and digital controls. An emphasis is placed on identifying and understanding control strategies to estimate energy savings. Hands on labs reinforce device identification. Students complete an energy efficiency controls calculation project. Prerequisites: C- or better in Commercial HVAC Systems & Analysis (NRG*122) and Energy Efficiency Methods (NRG*123); Co-requisites: Spreadsheet Applications (CSA*135), or Business Software Applications (BBG*115), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

NRG*130 Applied Renewable Energy f or 3 credits Businesses & Residences

2 lecture/2 lab

Focuses on the practical application of renewable energy technologies. Topics include energy and resource conservation and project siting, economics, financing, renewable energy and tax credits, technical and engineering aspects, regulatory issues, energy storage, monitoring and verification. Students study the advantages, limitations and potential of various energy sources. Wind, solar, small-scale hydro, ground-source heat pumps, combined heat and power, biofuels, fuel cells, and other technologies are examined. Students will learn the strategies and cost/benefit analyses employed by energy analysts to meet demand with clean energy production. Students will also complete their own study and proposal for a renewable energy project. Prerequisites: Placement into Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) and Composition (ENG*101), or above. (Elective Type: G)

NRG*131 Building Efficiency Auditing

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab Provides the basic knowledge for students to conduct energy audits of residential and small commercial buildings. Course content is planned to help students successfully pass the BPI and RESNET entry level certification exams. Prerequisites: Placement into Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or higher AND placement into Composition (ENG*101) or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

NRG*132 Industrial Energy Systems

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab Energy Managers are called upon to assess ways to save money by saving energy in industrial processes. Saving energy can typically lead to other direct benefits such as a more efficient process, better tolerances on parts, and less wear and tear on manufacturing equipment. Understanding these unique systems, accurately projecting energy savings, dealing with a business’ core operations and convincing reluctant managers that saving energy equals greater profit are valuable skills into today’s energy market. Topics include Compressed Air Systems and Controls, Lighting, Steam Systems, Ventilation, Dust Collection and Energy Auditing. Prerequisites: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137), AND Composition (ENG*101) or above; Co-requisite: Introductory Physics (PHY*110). (Elective Type: G)

NRG*133 Lighting Fundamentals

3 credits & Applications

2 lecture/2 lab Competence with lighting systems analysis is a basic necessity for commercial energy auditors. Topics include assessment of quantity and quality of light, light sources, luminaries, lighting controls, manufacturer lamp and ballast specifications, lighting power density, lighting-HVAC interactions, retrofit opportunities, cost savings analysis, and lighting codes/ regulations. Students create a directly supervised lighting audit project. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introductory Physics (PHY*110) and Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

NRG*240 Energy Investment Analysis

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab Enables students to analyze energy investments using spreadsheets to consider total cost-benefits over the life of the investment. Topics include: interest, simple payback and lifecycle cost analysis, time value of money, cash flow equivalence, cost-benefit analysis, effects of tax credits, depreciation, inflation and/or escalating fuel costs on energy investments, and cost estimating procedures. The emphasis will be on analysis of energy investments using spreadsheets to consider total cost-benefits over the life of the investment. Prerequisite: C- or better in Building Efficiency Auditing (NRG*131) or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

NRG*241 Commercial Energy Use

3 credits Analysis & Simulations

2 lecture/2 lab Provides students with exposure to the entire energy analysis process with a “hands-on” implementation of an actual building energy study and an energy modeling exercise using EQuest software. Prerequisites:C- or better in Building Efficiency Auditing (NRG*131), Commercial HVAC Systems & Analysis (NRG*122), and Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 7)

NRG*242 Energy Accounting

3 credits

2 lecture/2 lab A comprehensive approach to energy cost reduction for commercial buildings. We will study advanced utility consumption analysis (trends, adjusted baselines, weather normalization, load factors, load shapes, baseload), the value of operation and maintenance improvements, energy saving capital improvement measures (energy conservation measures), measurement and verification of the operating conditions of energy-using equipment, and monitoring systems to maintain cost reduction, and methods of implementing energy conservation measure projects and explore different utility incentive programs. Prerequisites: C or better in Spreadsheet Applications (CSA*135) or Business Software Applications (BBG*115), or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5)

NRG*290 Energy CO-OP Internship

3 credits

Provides AAS Degree students with a “capstone” course learning experience that integrates theory & practice in energy management. Students will execute an energy career-related internship with one of our Employer Partners to further develop their work skills, explore career options & network within their chosen industry. Students will work directly f or utility companies, energy management firms and energy service companies to apply skills and knowledge gained in the program to a real world work experience. Prerequisites: C- or better in Energy Control Strategies (NRG*124), Lighting Fundamentals & Applications (NRG*133); Energy Investment Analysis (NRG*240), or approval of Program Coordinator; Corequisites: Commercial Energy Use Analysis & Simulations (NRG*241), and Energy Accounting (NRG*242). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 7, 11)

Engineering Science

EGR*105 Robotics – Construction & Design

4 credits

3 lecture/3 lab Explore the multidisciplinary world of robotics, and its relevance to current humanitarian, social, and environmental concerns. Modeling fields of science and engineering, this class will be based on teamwork and cooperative problem solving in a supportive, hands on, laboratory environment. Solutions to a series of challenges will be designed, constructed, tested, and revised by students working together in groups. A standard, modular, mobile robotics system will be used to design and construct robots capable of carrying out a single task or multiple tasks related to a variety of applications. The role of science, engineering and technology in modern society will also be explored. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*111 Introduction to Engineering

3 credits (14-150)(TC-150)

Introduces students to engineering and the engineering profession through the application of physical conservation principles in analysis and design. Topics include dimensions and units, conservation of mass, momentum, energy and electric charge, static force balances, material properties and selection, measurement errors, mean and standard deviation, elementary engineering economics, and design projects. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*115 Programming For Engineers

3 credits

Introduces engineering students to structured and objectoriented programming methods. Students will examine and solve a variety of engineering problems. Students will design, code and execute modular programs using an object-oriented language such as C++ or Java. The course will include the use of abstract data types in solving classical engineering problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*211 Engineering Statics

(formerly Applied Mechanics I)

3 credits (14-211) Fundamentals of statics, including the resolution and composition of forces, the equilibrium of force systems, the analysis of forces acting on structure and machines, centroids, and moment of inertia. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus II (MAT*256) may be taken concurrently. (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*212 Engineering Dynamics

3 credits (14-212)

Introduces students to the fundamentals of engineering dynamics, including rectilinear and curvilinear motion, translation, rotation, and plane motion; work, energy and power; and impulse and momentum. The basic principles of dynamics are applied to engineering problems. Vector methods are covered. Prerequisites: C- or better in Engineering Statics (EGR*211). (Elective Type: G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*214 Engineering Thermodynamics

3 credits

Energy concepts and balances are covered. Basic definitions include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, ideal and real gases, thermodynamic properties, and introductory cycle analysis. Prerequisites: C- or better in Calculus-Based Physics I (PHY*221), and C- or better in Calculus I (MAT*254) or Precalculus (MAT* 186).(Elective Type:G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

EGR*221 Introduction to Electric

4 credits Circuit Analysis

3 lecture/3 lab An introduction to the techniques of analog circuit analysis. Topics include voltage, amperage, capacitance, inductance, node-voltage analysis, mesh-current analysis. Essential electrical components such as resistors, diodes, capacitors, inductors and operational amplifiers will be introduced and explored as well. The course will be supported by the use of the computer simulation programs and with lab work covering introductory circuit analysis. Prerequisites: C- or better in Calculus-Based Physics II (PHY* 222) and C- or better in Calculus II (MAT* 256). Co-requisite: Differential Equations (MAT*285) (Elective Type: G/ LAS) (Ability Assessed: 7)

English — Developmental

ENG*065 Integrated Reading and Writing I

6 credits

Prepares students for basic critical reading, writing, and academic strategies necessary for success in college. Begins to prepare students for the rigors of college-level work required across the disciplines. Students focus on understanding of, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts serve as inspiration, models, and evidence for students’ own writing. Students write exposition, interpretation/analysis, and argumentation essays. Students learn and practice specific study skills and strategies through reading, writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, and workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program; neither do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: Placement test score.

ENG*070 Reading & Writing Review

1 credit

Intensive reading and writing review before retaking the placement exam for students who have had previous reading and writing instruction, but need to review that knowledge before enrolling in a college reading and writing course. Students will learn and practice basic reading and writing skills. This course is intended as a review course only for students who have placed at the top of Integrated Reading & Writing I placement range and who may need a review in order to place into ENG 096: Introduction to College English. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program; neither do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: Students who are not satisfied with their English Placement.

ENG*075 Integrated Reading and Writing II

6 credits

Prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college level courses. Students strengthen the critical reading and writing strategies required across the disciplines. Students focus on understanding of, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program; neither do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: C or better in Integrated Reading andWriting I (ENG*065), or placement test score, or permission of Department Chair.

ENG*093 Introduction to College

Reading & Writing

3 credits (ENG-003) (89-118) A concentrated course that prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college level courses. Students strengthen the critical reading and writing strategies required across the disciplines. Students focus on understanding of, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts serve as models and sources f or students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program; neither do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: Placement test score OR permission of Department Chair.

ENG*096 Introduction to College English

6 credits

Prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college-level courses by integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources f or students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students learn and practice specific collegelevel skills through critical reading and writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: PlacementTest Score. English — Credit-Level

ENG*101 Composition

3 credits (ENG-101) (80-101)

Focuses on the study and practice of writing in an academic community. The course develops skills in text-based writing and introduction to college-level research. Students sharpen their ability to read, analyze, evaluate, and synthesize texts and ideas, and to argue effectively in writing that exhibits an intended purpose and audience. Students will draft and revise essays that are focused, organized, developed, and written in clear, standard English. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) orIntroduction toCollegeReading&Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: WRCX) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ENG*101E Composition Workshop

3 credits

Provides embedded support for credit-level Composition in a workshop environment. The course provides additional practice in applying Composition course abilities to portfolio essays, emphasizing additional “time on task,” discussion, in-class activities, and individualized instruction. Prerequisite: Placement into Composition with Embedded Support. (Elective Type: G)

ENG*103 Composition II

3 credits

Focuses on the process of research and research writing in the academic community. The course also strengthens competencies in exposition, persuasion, logic, textual evaluation, and critical analysis. Students will write a variety of research essays, one of which will be of substantial length. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CONX/WRCX) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ENG*105 Composition Portfolio

Revision Workshop

1 credits Provides additional practice in applying Composition course abilities to portfolio essays. Allows students who earned a grade of D+ in Composition to re-submit their portfolios at the end of the workshop instead of repeating the fullsemester Composition course. The course emphasizes individualized instruction and conferencing with the instructor. Recommendation for this course is entirely at the discretion of the original Composition instructor, and is offered only with the clear agreement on the student's part that enrolling in the course offers no guarantee whatsoever of raising his or her grade. Students must have completed the requirements for the Composition portfolio to be eligible for this workshop. Prerequisite: Completion of Composition (ENG*101) Portfolio Requirement*, recommendation of Composition instructor, and a grade of D+ in Composition.(Elective Type:G) (AbilityAssessed:11)

ENG*106 Writing for Business

3 credits (ENG-103) (80-191)

Students develop effective written communication skills f or contemporary business, industry and professional settings. The course also introduces students to essential oral presentation and interaction skills, and employment preparation. Focusing on workplace requirements for written documents and presentations, students learn to utilize various print and technological resources including the Internet. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101), or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 6, 11)

ENG*114 Children’s Literature

3 credits (ENG-114)

Familiarizes students with the complex range of material available in the area of children’s literature. It covers material from the traditional to the contemporary, for a variety of ages in a variety of genres, including picture books, folk tales, poetry, realistic and historical fiction, biographies and informational literature. Students learn to select and evaluate materials appropriate to individual and group needs and interests. Significant authors and illustrators, past and present, will be studied. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Ability Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*173 Perspectives in the Humanities

3 credits (RDG-101) (89-122)

Students utilize a variety of thinking and reading strategies to explore literature, philosophy, history, social sciences, and fine arts. Through an integration of readings, discussions, and a writing component involving analysis, synthesis, and evaluation; students study the history of ideas and universal themes in the humanities. This course is an English elective. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement test into Perspectives in the Humanities (ENG*173), OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

ENG*202 Technical Writing

3 credits (ENG-104) (80-104)

Provides directed practice in writing and oral skills needed in technical fields for specific audiences. Students create documentation for technical systems, including formal and informal reports, abstracts and reviews. Students learn strategies for producing such reports successfully, including planning, analyzing, purpose and audience, gathering data, and developing revising techniques, and oral presentations. Students are encouraged to choose topics based on their major or intended career. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

ENG*213 Poetry

3 credits

Explores the nature and variety of poetry. Poems from a wide range of periods, origins, and viewpoints provide material for a study of the concepts which are a part of reading, appreciating, and writing about poetry. Students study narrative, lyric, and dramatic poetry, as well as poetic elements such as diction, tone, images, figures of speech, symbols, rhythm, and meter. Prerequisite:C- or better in Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*216 Contemporary Fiction

3 credits (ENG-213) (81-253)

Focuses on fiction from the post WWII period to the present. Students will concentrate on how fiction of this period engages ideas such as history and authority, popular culture, warfare, science and technology, mythology, and aesthetics. In this course, a range of works will be read and discussed in order to define and examine shifts, sometimes radical, in the form and nature of fiction. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

ENG*221 American Literature I

3 credits (ENG-211) (81-251)

Surveys major American writing, prose and poetry, from the early Colonial period to the Civil War period, providing a chronological history as well as a focus on the multicultural dimension of America’s literature. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*222 American Literature II

3 credits (ENG-212) (81-252)

Surveys major American writing, prose and poetry, from its emergence with Whitman, Dickinson, and Twain through the contemporary period, focusing on 20th-century American literature as an evolving multicultural literature. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/ LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*231 British Literature I

3 credits (ENG-217)(82-281)

Introduces students to the English literary tradition, covering its Anglo-Saxon and medieval roots and ending with the Restoration and the 18th century. It includes works from Old, Middle, and Modern English. Students will consider numerous works, such as Beowulf, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*232 British Literature II

3 credits (ENG-218) (82-282)

Introduces students to the major British poets, novelists, essayists, and short story writers of the 18th, 19th- and 20thcenturies. Students will examine the impact of such issues as Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution, Democracy, Victorian sensibilities, the rise of technology, and Realism on the literature. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*233 Shakespeare

3 credits (ENG-221) (82-222)

Introduces Shakespeare, his time period, and his contributions to literature through an exploration of poetry and dramatic works. Students may view, analyze, and interpret film, video or live performances of his work. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*241 World Literature I

3 credits

Surveys world literature from the ancients to 1650. The course emphasizes the connections between culture, history, and literary works, while exploring the diversity of human expression and response to the commonality of human experience. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

ENG*242 World Literature II

3 credits

Surveys world literature from 1650 to the present. The course emphasizes the connections between culture, history, and literary works as the world becomes increasingly interconnected and interdependent. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

ENG*247 Latin American Literature

3 credits (ENG-226)

A study of Latin American fiction from the Colonial to the “boom” periods of Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Brazil, and others. Students will engage in textual analysis and will examine historical, cultural, and aesthetic trends, themes, and problems through discussion and writing. The instructor may concentrate on a major theme and/or follow the development of movements such as Realism, Modernism, Magic Realism, or the connections between indigenous and African narrative cycles and European models. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*250 Studies in Ethnic Literature

3 credits (ENG-223) (81-281)

Surveys writing by various ethnicities and races in American culture, including but not limited to Native Americans, European immigrants, and African, Hispanic- and Asian-Americans. This course examines how ethnic writing enables and resists assimilation, and how the literature of individual ethnicities underlies mainstream American literature and, at times, becomes part of the mainstream. The course also explores the history and sociology of immigration and multiculturalism. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*251 African American Literature

3 credits (ENG-227)

This course considers a wide range of literature, encompassing not only the written word, but also the oral tradition, including the African origins of storytelling. Examining slave narratives, novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and lyrics, students explore aspects of the African American experience from its origin in folklore through contemporary African American cultural expressions such as rap. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*260 Studies in Women’s Literature

3 credits (ENG-225) (80-285)

A study of traditional and non-traditional images of women in literature and an introduction to feminist literary criticism. Readings will explore central themes of women in society and as literary figures from early history to the present, with a focus on works from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

ENG*268 Modern Drama

3 credits

Surveys dramatic literature (plays) from the 19th century to the present. This era is considered a “golden age” of the theater, as the genre developed as a major voice analyzing social issues of class, race, and gender and the major political and aesthetic movements of the period. The course will focus on the connection between the cultural and literary histories as well as how the means of production (advances in technical theater and eventually film) affected the structure and subject matter of plays. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS/LIT) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ENG*281 Creative Writing

3 credits (ENG-201) (80-291)

This course engages students in the study and composition of various types of creative writing, such as fiction (short stories, novels), poetry, plays and/or screenplays, and, optionally, nonfiction articles, essays and other texts, with some focus on professional audiences and marketing one’s work. Students will study published works to analyze issues key to professional writers, ranging from both the mechanics and aesthetics of craft to past and present standards of literary markets. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ENG*283 Creative Writing: Fiction

3 credits

Focuses on the elements and techniques of fiction writing. Students will study examples of fiction of many kinds and discuss and practice elements of craft, such as character, conflict development, dialogue, and point of view. Students will write fiction and discuss their work in a workshop environment. The Humanities Department may require submission of relevant writing sample or portfolio material. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ENG*285 Memoir Writing

3 credits

Provides students with practical experience in writing about the events, places, and people of their own lives in the form of memoir. Through writing assignments and class discussion of readings, students explore the range of memoirs available f or use as models and elements such as voice and perspective, tone, plot, characterization, and symbolic and figurative language. The Humanities Department may require submission of relevant writing sample or portfolio material. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/ HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX) (Ability Assessed: 1)

ENG*293 Survey of Literary Genres

3 credits

An introduction to major literary types, including poetry, short story, drama, and the novel. Readings may be organized around a central theme. Students develop a critical sense of literature through oral and written analysis. Prerequisite: C or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: E/G/HU/ LAS/LIT) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 1, 11)

English as a Second Language

ESL*001 English as a Second Language:

3 credits Integrated Skills I

This is the first course in the ESL curriculum. This course integrates the study of grammar, reading, writing, and speaking. The primary focus is the study of level-appropriate grammar topics including the following: present tense and present progressive verbs, verb forms for “to be,” common irregular verbs, yes/no and information questions, and common contractions. Students practice these structures in writing and speaking contexts. The secondary focus is on reading and listening to level-appropriate texts. Additionally, students learn functional vocabulary related to family, daily life and school. This course prepares students for ESL: Grammar II and ESL: Writing and Reading II. Note: Student must have limited proficiency in three of the four skill areas of English – speaking,reading,writing and listening.(Elective Type:G)

ESL*123 English as a Second Language:

Writing & Reading II

3 credits (ESL-111) (89-128) This is the second level of writing and reading in the ESL program. The reading component emphasizes recognition and use of high frequency vocabulary words. Additionally, students learn to differentiate between main ideas and details in readings of a beginning level of difficulty. The writing component focuses on developing basic writing skills. This includes writing simple, compound and complex sentences as well as basic paragraph development. Correct spelling, punctuation and capitalization are also included in this writing component. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Skills I (ESL*001),OR appropriate placement test score,OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G)

ESL*125 English as a Second Language:

Grammar II

3 credits (ESL-101) (89-126) This is the second or high beginning course in the ESL grammar series. The primary focus is the study of level-appropriate grammar topics including the following: simple and continuous verbs in the present, past and future; nouns and pronouns as subjects and objects; modifiers; prepositions; and common conjunctions. Students will also study common sentence structures for statements and questions. Students will identify and practice using these structures with the goals to improve clarity of expression in writing and comprehension in reading. A secondary focus is on using and understanding the new structures in speaking and for listening comprehension. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Skills I (ESL*001), OR appropriate placement test score OR permission of the Department Chair.(Elective Type:G)

ESL*133 English as a Second Language:

Writing & Reading III

3 credits (ESL-112) (89-129) This is the intermediate level of writing and reading in the ESL program or the third level in the sequence. The reading section emphasizes skills and knowledge that will help students develop their reading comprehension, including their ability to infer vocabulary meaning through various clues. The writing section focuses on practicing a variety of complex sentences, producing well organized paragraphs, and developing compositions. It also reinforces the use of intermediate-level grammatical structures through the writing activities and continues to exercise correct spelling, punctuation and capitalization. Prerequisite: C- or better in ESL:Writing & Reading II (ESL*123) OR appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ESL*135 English as a Second Language:

Grammar III

3 credits (ESL-102) (89-127) This is the third or low intermediate course in the ESL grammar series. The primary focus is the study of level-appropriate grammar topics including the following: past and future tenses, modals, gerunds, infinitives and phrasal verbs. Students will also study the comparative forms of adjectives and adverbs, reflexive pronouns, articles and nouns. Students will identify and practice producing these structures with the goals to improve clarity of expression in writing and comprehension in reading. A secondary focus is on using and understanding the new structures in speaking and for listening comprehension. Prerequisites: C- or better in ESL Grammar II (ESL*125) OR appropriate placement test score or permission of the Department Chair. (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ESL*143 English as a Second Language:

Writing & Reading IV

3 credits (ESL-211) (89-130) Is the high-intermediate writing course in the ESL: Writing & Reading series. It complements ESL Grammar IV. The course integrates writing and reading. The writing focus introduces the stages of the writing process from pre-writing to composing to revising. The reading focus is on reading longer, more complex texts, improving comprehension, and building an academic vocabulary. Students write a variety of personal essays using common development modes such as narrative, descriptive, definition, classification and cause/effect. Students will begin to use thesis statements and topic sentences. Attention is given to grammatical problems commonly present in the writings of ESL students. This course prepares students for ESL: Writing & Reading V. Prerequisite: C- or better in ESL:Writing & Reading III (ESL*133), appropriate placement test score, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ESL*145 English as a Second Language:

Grammar IV

3 credits (ESL-201) (89-131) This is the fourth or high intermediate course in the ESL grammar series. The primary focus is the study of levelappropriate grammar topics including the following: perfective tenses in the active voice, all tenses in the passive voice, adjective clauses, and noun clauses. Students will also review and expand their knowledge of gerunds, infinitives, phrasal verbs and modals. Students will identify and practice producing these structures with the goals to improve clarity of expression in writing and comprehension in reading. A secondary focus is on using and understanding the new structures in speaking and for listening comprehension. Prerequisites: C- or better in ESL Grammar III (ESL*135), appropriate placement test score, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ESL*149 English as a Second Language:

Pronunciation Workshop

3 credits (ESL-150) Within the ESL discipline, this course focuses on the pronunciation of American English. Topics of study include the following: consonant and vowel sounds of English; stress, rhythm and intonation patterns of words and phrases; patterns affecting speech such as deletions, insertions, and linking; and differences between spelling and speech. Students will practice speaking using a variety of techniques with the aim to add speech patterns reflective of American English. Students will also learn how to evaluate their own speech in order to become more competent and self-assured speakers. Prerequisite: C- or better in ESL: Grammar III (ESL*135) or ESL: Writing & Reading III (ESL*133), appropriate placement test score, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/ HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ESL*152 English as a Second Language:

Writing & Reading V

6 credits (ESL-143) This is the low-advanced writing course in the ESL Writing & Reading series. The reading focus is on improved comprehension of level-appropriate academic and expository texts so that students can both discuss texts and reinvest information from texts into discussions and writing. The writing focus integrates and refines the stages of the writing process from prewriting to revising while reviewing basics such as thesis statements and topic sentences. Students read, write, revise, participate in group work and confer with teacher. In addition, grammar topics will be included in support of reading and writing. A C or better ensures admission into ESL Writing & Reading VI. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ESL*153 English as a Second Language:

Writing & Reading V

3 credits (ESL-143) Is the advanced writing course in the ESL Writing & Reading series within the ESL curriculum. It complements ESL Grammar V and utilizes an integrated approach. The reading focus is on improved comprehension of academic and expository texts. The writing focus integrates and refines the stages of the writing process from prewriting to revising and editing. Students write a variety of essays–including expository essays, argument essays, and researched reports. Students also develop skills in paraphrasing, and developing generalizations. The course also stresses the acknowledgement of outside source material and introduces students to formal intext citations. Attention is given to grammatical problems commonly present in the writings of ESL students – especially those that interfere with precision. This course prepares ESL students for Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162) C- or better in Grammar V (ESL*155) is recommended but not required. Prerequisites: C- or better in Writing & Reading IV (ESL*143), appropriate placement test score, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ESL*155 English as a Second Language:

Grammar V

3 credits (ESL-202) This is the final or advanced course in the ESL grammar series. The primary focus is the study of level-appropriate grammar topics including the following: contrary to fact verbs, wishes, and verbs of urgency; reported speech; adverb clauses and reduced adverb clauses; and connectives devices of all kinds. Students will also review and expand their knowledge of the parts of speech, gerunds and infinitives. Students will identify and practice producing these structures with the goals to improve clarity of expression in writing and comprehension in reading. A secondary focus is on using and understanding the new structures in speaking and for listening comprehension. Prerequisites: C- or better in ESL Grammar IV (ESL*145), appropriate placement test score, OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ESL*157 Oral Communications V

3 credits

This is the advanced course in oral skills in the ESL curriculum. The primary focus is to build proficiency in the listening and speaking skills that English as Second Language students need to be successful in an academic setting. The course will focus on two types of skills: those needed to listen to, comprehend, and take notes in academic lectures and those needed to participate in the full range of classroom activities including asking questions, interrupting, using and interpreting common modes of agreement and disagreement, and communication skills associated with group work. Prerequisites: C- or better in ESL: Grammar III (ESL*135) and/or ESL: Reading & Writing III (ESL*133), or placement into ESL Level IV (ESL*143 and

ESL*145) or higher, or permission of Humanities Department

Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ESL*162 English as a Second Language: Reading & Writing VI 6 credits (ESL-202) In this advanced writing and reading course, students continue to develop fluency, clarity, organizational skills and the me-chanics of effective writing with a focus on the linguistic and rhetorical needs of second language learners. Course content and writing assignments are based on reading selections, evaluation of primary and secondary sources and student texts. Students read a range of moderately complex texts. Students write, revise and edit drafts, participate in group work and confer with teachers and peers. Portfolio assessment will be required, including at least one timed, in-class writing assignment. This six credit-course counts toward the foreign language requirement in either the Liberal Arts or General Studies degree. Completion of this course with a C or better ensures admission into Composition (ENG*101). Prerequisites: C- or better in ESL:Writing & Reading V (ESL*153), placement test, or permission of Humanities Chair. Grammar V (ESL *152) recommended. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type (in Degree Works): WRCX) (Abilities Assessed: 6, 11)

ESL*175 English as a Second Language:

3 credits Grammar VI

Designed to be a comprehensive review of English grammar f or advanced students who are nonnative speakers of English. General topics will include a review of verb tense and aspect, helping verbs, conditional verbs, passive voice verbs, and the verb forms associated with reported speech. The course will also review sentence-level coordination and subordination so that students can focus on composing more sophisticated, grammatically correct, compound and complex sentences. Throughout the semester, students will work on recognizing and editing common errors in their own writings which may indicate additional topics for review. It is designed to supplement ESL: Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162). Prerequisites:C- or better in ESL GrammarV (ESL*155) OR placement in ESLWriting & ReadingVI (ESL*162) or Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or permission of department chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 11)

ESL*190 English as a Second Language:

3 credits Vocabulary Development

Designed for students who want to improve and expand their knowledge of vocabulary used in conversational English and Academic Writing prior to taking Composition (ENG*101). Vocabulary Development is an intermediate course that focuses on improving the comprehension and use of appropriate vocabulary to strengthen academic reading and writing skills. Within the reading component, students will utilize context clues and dictionary definitions to strengthen their comprehension of text material. Within the writing component, students will explore the distinctions between the literal and figurative meanings of the words through the use of a dictionary and thesaurus. Further investigation of appropriate vocabulary usage will be explored through the study of prefixes and suffixes, synonyms and antonyms, idiomatic expressions, phrasal verbs and words commonly confused. Instruction in all areas will be focused on incorporating these skills into academic writing assignments. Prerequisite: C- or better in Writing & Reading IV (ESL*143), or appropriate placement test score, or permission of Humanities Chair.(Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS)

ESL*250 Teaching English to Speakers of

Other Languages (TESOL)

Methodology 3 credits (ESL-301) (99-160) Designed for those seeking certification in English as a Second Language in Connecticut. Course involves reading, discussions, observation of English as a Second Language classes in progress, the development and presentation of English as a Second Language lessons and teaching materials, and a research paper. Prerequisite: B.A. degree or permission of Department Chair (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Abilities Assessed: 6, 11)

French

FRE*111 Elementary French I

4 credits

Presents the essentials of French grammar needed to read, write, and interact in French using simple phrases and common expressions and highlights the diverse cultures of Frenchspeaking peoples. Context for learning is self, family, school and community. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

FRE*112 Elementary French II

4 credits (FR-102) (44-102)

Builds and expands skills from Elementary French I with further study of French grammar and of the diverse cultures of French-speaking peoples. Students begin to negotiate simple transactions and dilemmas in French using more complex phrases and common expressions. Activities from daily life are the contexts for learning. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary French I (FRE*101 or FRE*111) or permission of the Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Geography

GEO*101 Introduction to Geography

3 credits (GEOG-110) (55-101)

Surveys the distribution of and interactions between various natural and human phenomena on the face of the globe. Topics will include maps, landforms, climate, natural resources, population, cultural patterns, political geography, economic patterns, and urban geography. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

Graphic Design

GRA*101 Design Principles

3 credits (GRPH-101) (74-151)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduction to the basic elements of design (line, shape, value, texture, space) and their organization on a two-dimensional surface through the principles of design (balance, unity, emphasis, repetition, rhythm, etc.) into effective design statements. Assignments progress from manipulation of geometric shapes to creation and composition of representational images in the discovery of how design principles apply to the fields of art and design. Primary media are markers and cut paper. (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*110 Introduction to Computer Graphics

3 credits (GRPH-111) (74-260)

2 lecture/2 studio An introduction to the computer as a graphic design and artist’s tool. Using Macintosh OS, students learn basic use and application of vector illustration (Adobe Illustrator), raster image (Adobe Photoshop), and scanning software programs to the art and design process. Emphasis is on “hands on” use of the computer, and how the computer can aid the artist’s and designer’s problem solving process through interactive visual alternatives. (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*200 Visual Communications

3 credits (GRPH-102) (74-152)

2 lecture/2 studio Typography and problem-solving in the field of graphic communications. Focus will be on the use of typography and image in preparing solutions to graphic design problems. Design process, methods, materials, and conceptual idea development are introduced and applied to the creation of visual communications using both traditional and computer graphics mediums (Adobe Illustrator & Photoshop). Projects range from experimental type arrangements, compositions, and symbol designs to the pragmatic application of typography and image in design and layout. Prerequisite: C- or better in Design Principles (GRA*101) AND C- or better in Introduction to Computer Graphics (GRA*110). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*201 Typography and Design I

3 credits (GRPH-150)

2 lecture/2 studio This course focuses on the exploration and application of typography in graphic design. Students will learn and apply the use of page layout software (InDesign) in an in-depth study of the creative and pragmatic applications of typography, and explore the interdependent relationship between type and image in visual communications. Prerequisite: C- or better in Visual Communications (GRA*200). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*203 Design and Production

3 credits (GRPH-201)(74-251)

2 lecture/2 studio Students will apply previously learned design, typography, and page layout skills (InDesign) in the creation of design layouts and mechanical art for print production. A mixture of technical and creative projects will be presented with emphasis on design and production for the printed piece. The importance of precision in final mechanical art preparation will be stressed as will technical facility in the use of electronic production tools and techniques. Prerequisite: C- or better in Typography and Design I (GRA*201). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*205 Typography and Design II

3 credits (GRPH-202) (74-252)

2 lecture/2 studio Focuses on the further exploration of typographic studies. Students will apply previously learned design and typography theory to conceptualize solutions to more complex visual communication problems through the use of professional level graphic design page layout software (InDesign). This intense focus in graphic design will further a student’s production skills and knowledge, extend the student’s capacity for conceptual thinking and visual problem solving, and allow for the further exploration of the creative and practical aspects of typography and the special relationship between type and image. Prerequisite: C- or better in Typography and Design I (GRA*201). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*227 Interactive Media

3 credits (GRPH-220)

2 lecture/2 studio Students will apply previously learned design software and typography skills to design for interactive media using Adobe Flash. Students will take interactive media design from concept, through storyboard, to design and production, and learn how to structure and present information for clarity and impact by combining type, image, color, motion, sound, animation and interactivity. Prerequisites: C- or better in Design Principles (GRA*101), Introduction to Computer Graphics (GRA*110),AND Visual Communications (GRA*200), OR permission of Program Coordinator.(Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*231 Digital Imaging

3 credits (GRPH-212)(74-261)

2 lecture/2 studio Focuses on the continued use of digital imagery in art and design, by furthering a student’s skill in the use of raster image (Adobe Photoshop), and scanning software. The course goes beyond the basic techniques covered in Introduction to Computer Graphics, exploring more advanced electronic image creation and manipulation techniques, and addresses some of the technical issues facing a computer artist and designer. Prerequisites: C- or better in Design Principles (GRA*101) AND Introduction to Computer Graphics (GRA*110). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*236 Digital Illustration

3 credits (GRPH-213)(74-213)

2 lecture/2 studio Advanced exploration of the tools and techniques available to the graphic designer in the vector drawing environment using Adobe Illustrator. This course takes students beyond the basics covered in Introduction to Computer Graphics, and explores advanced image creation and manipulation tools, effects, graphic illustration techniques, and typographic functions in applying the computer graphics medium to problems in graphic design. Prerequisite: C- or better in Visual Communications (GRA*200). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*260 Web Design

3 credits (GRPH-214)(74-214)

2 lecture/2 studio Introduction to Website design using WordPress. Create websites, blog about your activities, and integrate social media into your online presence. Students will apply previously learned design, typography, and software skills to create, organize, and structure content for clarity and impact through the use of type, color, image, and interactivity using Wordpress. Prerequisite: C- or better in Visual Communications (GRA*200) or permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks):AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*262 Web Design II

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio Students will apply previously learned layout, typography, graphic software, and web design skills to the creation of websites using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will generate design concepts, create storyboards, and build websites that structure and present information for clarity and impact by combining type, image, color, sound, and interactivity. Prerequisite: C- or better in Web Design (GRA*260), OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed:1)

GRA*273 Motion Design

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio An introduction to the concepts and techniques in the creation and production of motion design animation using Adobe Flash. The course will cover the kinds of motion design, concept and story board and computer generation of motion design sequences. Prerequisite: C- or better in Visual Communications (GRA*200).(Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*275 3D Computer Modeling

3 credits (ART-222)

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced approach to the creation of visual information on the computer, featuring creative imaging and image construction. Topics include three-dimensional modeling and environment building; integration with multiple programs; formatting f or output; and file management and storage. Selected programs used in the industry will be applied to contextual aesthetic problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in Electronic Painting and Drawing (ART*220) OR permission of Department Chair.(Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*277 Advanced 3D Computer Modeling

3 credits (ART-225)

2 lecture/2 studio An advanced three-dimensional modeling course that builds upon skills learned in Three-Dimensional Computer Modeling. This course reaches deeper into the three-dimensional environment with more focus on detailed structures, textures, lighting and the beginning of animation. Students will learn how to control and render complex three-dimensional files and create entire scenes for mini-productions. Animation techniques, processes and hardware requirements are introduced to the potential animator. Prerequisite: C- or better in 3D Computer Modeling (GRA*275). (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

GRA*291 Graphic Design Portfolio

3 credits 2 lecture/2 studio

Students will prepare a portfolio and resume that demonstrates previously acquired art, design, production, and software skills for use in transfer application and employment search. Topics covered include: self assessment; portfolio design and creation; resume design; taking slides and digital images; digital image conversion; job search; and transfer to other college curriculums. Prerequisite: C- or better in Typography and Design I (GRA*201),OR permission of Program Coordinator. (Elective Type: FA/G/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/ CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

Health

HLT*103 Investigation in Health Careers

3 credits

Designed to assist traditional and non-traditional first year college students to meet the expectations of a curriculum and a career in health-related fields. The student will become familiar with the rigors of higher education and the specific skills needed to maximize the student’s opportunity for academic and clinical success. The course will include a comprehensive overview of the duties and responsibilities associated with clinical competency. Interdisciplinary learning strategies, correlating clinical and didactic education, life management skills, work ethics, and critical thinking skills necessary for all health providers will be emphasized. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

HLT*112 Basic Medical Support

2 credits (ALH-121)(SCI*121) (SCI-101) (55-103)

1 lecture/1clinic Provides professionals (police, fire, coaches, athletic trainers, lifeguards, educators, public safety, medical and dental personnel, etc.) with knowledge and skills in providing basic emergency medical care until further assistance arrives. Focus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (2 person CPR) training f or the professional. Certification will be granted upon successful completion. (Elective Type: G)

HLT*201 Nutrition for Allied

Health Professionals

3 credits (DH-/DHY*114) Provides health care professionals with information on the current concepts in nutrition. The course includes biochemistry and metabolism of nutrients as well as nutrition throughout the life cycle. Nutritional counseling is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: C- or better in Concepts of Chemistry (CHE*111), General Biology I (BIO*121) orAnatomy & Physiology I (BIO*211). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Ability Assessed: 6)

History

HIS*101 Western Civilization I

3 credits (HIS-101) (93-101)

Surveys the cultures that contributed to the development of the West as a distinctive part of the world. It examines the major ideas, people, events, and institutions that shaped the Western world from the rise of Mesopotamia to the Protestant Reformation. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) orIntroduction toCollege English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type:G/HI/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works:HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*102 Western Civilization II

3 credits (HIS-102) (93-102)

Surveys the development of Western civilization from the sixteenth century to the present. It examines the maj or ideas, people, events, and institutions that have shaped the modern Western world. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*106 History of Africa since 1900

3 credits (HIS-104)

Examines the period following colonization by the European powers; the African response in the development of nationalist independence movements; post-independence Africa and the growth of Pan-Islam and Pan-African ideals; the impact of superpower conflict in Africa; globalization; and contemporary crises and opportunities. Prerequisite: C or better in Composition (ENG*101) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: HISX) (Abilities Assessed: 4, 11)

HIS*121 World Civilization I

3 credits

A survey of world cultures from the earliest complex societies to the emergence of an expansionist culture in Western Europe around 1500 CE. Emphasis throughout is on the development and expansion of major civilizations, the interactions among those civilizations, and the variety of cultures that resulted from those interactions. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*122 World Civilization II

3 credits

A survey of major world trends and conflicts since the emergence of an expansionist culture in Western Europe around 1500 CE. The emphasis will be on the impact of Western imperialism on non-Western cultures, the responses of those cultures, and the ways in which the interactions have shaped the contemporary world. (This course may be taken by students who have not completed HIS*121, World Civilization I.) Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*147 The History & Culture of

3 credits Immigrant Groups in America

This course examines the history and culture of immigrant groups in America, particularly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include the history of immigration from Africa, the Carribean, Europe, and Asia, the shaping of an ethnic identity among various immigrant people, and the literature written by and about members of those groups. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*201 U.S. History I

3 credits (HIS-111) (97-151)

Surveys the factors that contributed to the development of the United States as a new nation. It examines the maj or people, events, institutions, ideas, and conflicts that shaped the nation from the earliest contacts between Europeans and indigenous populations to the Civil War. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/HI/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*202 U.S. History II

3 credits (HIS-112) (97-152)

Surveys the development of the United States from the Civil War to present. It examines the major ideas, people, events, and institutions that have shaped the United States since 1865. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) orIntroduction toCollegeReading&Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: HISX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

HIS*213 U.S. Since World War II

3 credits (HIS-151) (97-153)

Explores the history of the United States from 1945 to the present. It examines the major ideas, people, events, and institutions that have shaped American society since World War II. Topics will include the Cold War, the postwar economic boom, the welfare state, civil rights, changing demographic patterns, the Reagan Revolution, globalization, and the war on terrorism. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*215 History of Women in America

3 credits

Examines the role of women in the historical development of the United States, emphasizing women’s struggle for political, social, and economic equality since the Revolutionary War. Topics will include the colonial period, suffragist movement, changing gender roles and expectations, women in the home and workplace, the feminist movement, and reactions to women’s rights. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*218 African American History

3 credits

An historical survey of the varieties of experience that have shaped African American life. Specific topics will include the African roots of African American culture; slave trade and the Middle Passage; slavery, resistance and the struggle f or emancipation; Reconstruction and Jim Crow; the growth of distinctive African American cultures in literature, music, sports, and the arts; the struggle for equality; and contemporary African American culture, including the post World War II Caribbean influx. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/ HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency Type in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*225 The Constitution and

American Society

3 credits (HIS-131) Examines both the historical foundation of the U.S. Constitution and its current implementation. Provides students with an opportunity to understand and discuss some of the maj or Supreme Court decisions in American history and their impact on American society. Students who satisfactorily complete

HIS*225 may not take POL*225. Prerequisite: C- or better

in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction

to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/ HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*227 The Vietnam War

3 credits

Examines the causes, course, and consequences of the Vietnam War, focusing on American intervention in that conflict. Topics will include Vietnam’s history and culture, the rise of communism in Southeast Asia, the United States containment policy, American military intervention in Southeast Asia, the American search for a winning strategy, the anti-war movement, and the aftereffects of the war in both Vietnam and the United States. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*243 The Holocaust

3 credits

Examines the particular historical context of the Holocaust and addresses the moral and philosophical challenges posed by genocide in the modern era. Prerequisite: C or better in Composition (ENG*101) OR permission of department chair. (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

HIS*248 History of Religion in America

3 credits

Examines the role of religion in the creation and evolution of American society from the colonial era to the present. Topics will include religious pluralism, traditions of tolerance and intolerance, religion and social reform, secularism and fundamentalism, clashes and reconciliations of faith and reason, and the interplay of church and state. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HI/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Ability Assessed: 4)

Human Services

HSE*101 Introduction to Human Services

3 credits (HMSV-101) (49-101)

Focuses on a variety of human needs within the United States. Issues discussed are social supports in meeting human needs, theoretical perspectives, social policy, target populations and the characteristics of a human services professional. Prerequisite: C or better in better in Integrated Reading andWriting I (ENG*065), or placement into Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 5, 6)

HSE*185 Family Violence Intervention

3 credits (HMSV-120)

Introduces spouse/partner, child and elder abuse, the three types of family violence. Students will examine contributing factors, review victim/perpetrator profiles, and evaluate community responses. Laws/legislation related to the protection of the person and the community also will be considered. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introduction to Human Services (HSE*101) or C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101), OR C- or better in Social Problems (SOC*103). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 10)

HSE*236 Legal Issues in Human Services

3 Credits

Human service professionals encounter legal issues that pertain to the profession and/or the needs of clients on a daily basis. This course introduces students to the legal system and the laws that affect the human service professional and their clients. Students will explore legal issues commonly encountered by clients such as domestic violence, immigration status, income supports and others. In addition, legal issues affecting the human service professional such as confidentiality mandated reporting and how to work with client involved in legal processes will be examined. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introduction to Human Services (HSE*101) and Composition (ENG*101), or permission of the Program Coordinator.(Elective Type:G/HU) (Ability Assessed:10)

HSE*243 Human Services Skills and Methods

3 credits (HMSV-201) (49-107)

An examination of human services as a holistic response to human needs through various strategies, skills, and techniques. Helping strategies involving casework, natural helping networks, assessment, and evaluation will be explored. Skills will be developed in the areas of observation, listening, intake, referral, and report writing. Prerequisites: C- or better in Introduction to Human Services (HSE*101), General Psychology I (PSY*111), Principles of Sociology (SOC*101), and Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G) (Ability Assessed: 2)

HSE*281 Human Services Field Work I

3 credits (HMSV-210) (49-301)

Students will be placed in a private or public social service agency or in a position in business that is human service related, so that they may apply the theories and skills acquired in their academic studies. This field experience will be received under the joint supervision of personnel in the assigned organization and the college instructor. This course is open only to those students who are currently enrolled in the Human Services Degree program. Prerequisite: C- or better in Human Services Skills and Methods (HSE*243). (Elective Type: G) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 6)

Humanities

HUM*290 General Studies Capstone Experience

1 credit

The capstone course will be based on a series of reflections on how students have demonstrated competence in the General Education abilities in the courses they have taken as part of the General Studies program. Because these abilities constitute the program’s outcomes, students may use a variety of methods to show how they have satisfied these objectives in their courses, culminating in an e-Portfolio in which students post their reflections on each of these abilities and how they were assessed in their courses. The reflections will then be graded by the instructor of this capstone experience. Because the General Studies program outcomes are composed of the General Education abilities, students will be expected to demonstrate basic aptitude in all of them. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) and permission of the program coordinator; minimum of 30 credits completed within the General Studies Program. Co-requisite: C or better in Composition II (ENG*103). Independent Study Independent Study 1-6 credit hours (01-201) An opportunity to specialize in advanced projects not covered by courses listed in the college catalog. Students have individual and/or group conferences with faculty. Independent study does not include regularly offered courses. Prerequisite: Please see this Catalog’s Academic Information section.

Italian

ITA*111 Elementary Italian I

4 credits

Presents the essentials of Italian grammar needed to read, write, and interact in Italian using simple phrases and common expressions, and highlights the diverse cultures of Italianspeaking peoples. Context for learning is self, family, school and community. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

ITA*112 Elementary Italian II

4 credits

Builds and expands skills from Elementary Italian I with further study of Italian grammar and the cultures of Italian speaking peoples. Students begin to negotiate simple transactions and dilemmas in Italian using more complex phrases and common expressions. Context for learning is studying activities from daily life. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Italian I (ITA*101 or ITA*111) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Latin

LAT*101 Elementary Latin I

3 credits

The primary study focus is on learning the basic elements of Latin vocabulary and grammar. The primary task focus will be on translating from Latin into English and from English into Latin. Reading comprehension will also be built through graded readings in Latin. A secondary study focus will be on aspects of classical Roman history and culture as they relate to the modern world. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

LAT*102 Elementary Latin II

3 credits

The primary study focus builds and expands the grammatical concepts established in Elementary Latin I. The primary task focus will be on translating from Latin into English and from English into Latin. Reading comprehension will also be built through graded readings in Latin. A secondary study focus will be on aspects of classical Roman history, culture, and authors as they relate to the modern world. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Latin I (LAT*101) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Linguistics

LIN*101 Introduction to Linguistics

3 credits

Introduction to the study of language and the fundamentals of linguistic theory. The course focuses on the basic ways that generative linguists study languages and language use. Students will examine linguistic data in each topic in order to better understand their own language use and speaker judgments. Prerequisite: C- or better in either Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) orIntroduction toCollegeReading&Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type:G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 9)

Manufacturing

MFG*127 Engineering Graphics

3 credits (21-115) (TC-115)

Provides practical explanations of how to interpret engineering/ technical drawings using the latest American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Focus is on standardization and quality standards applied in the engineering and technology trades with regard to technical drawings. Prerequisite: C- or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095). (Elective Type: G)

MFG*171 Introduction to Lean Manufacturing

3 credits

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge of current continuous process improvement methodologies in use today within competitive manufacturing environments. This introductory course will expose the student to the basic concepts of Lean Manufacturing theory and the various tools and techniques involved with a lean implementation. This course will be presented following the lean-six sigma process methodology of DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) to ensure that at the completion of the course, the student will be competent to participate effectively as a team member in lean implementation projects. (Elective Type: G)

MFG*271 Advanced Lean Manufacturing

3 credits

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge to implement lean improvements within the production environment using a systematic approach. This course will follow an improvement project (from the student’s current employer or case study) through the five stages of the DMAIC problem solving methodology. At the completion of the course, the student will be competent to effectively lead a lean implementation project within a company. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introduction to Lean Manufacturing (MFG*171). (Elective Type: G)

Mathematics

MAT*070 Algebra Review

1 credit

A review course designed to allow students to build a better foundation and possibly place into a higher level mathematics course. Students will take a diagnostic test which will allow the course to be tailored to the individual student. Each student will need to purchase a MyFoundationsLab code and will be working at their own pace with the help of an instructor. At the end of the course, students may retake the placement test to place into a higher level mathematics class. (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*075 Prealgebra–

Number Sense/Geometry

3 credits (MAT-070) A course designed for those students who need reinforcement in the basic skills of arithmetic and directed numbers. Topics included in the course are as follows: arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and the negative counterparts of those sets of numbers; ratio, proportion and percent; measurement; introduction to the basic concepts of algebra. This course does not satisfy a mathematics elective in any program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score for PreAlgebra—Number Sense/Geometry (MAT*075). (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*075W Prealgebra with College

Study Skills

6 credits 4.5 lecture/1.5 lab A course designed for those students who need reinforcement in college study skills and the basic skills of arithmetic and directed numbers. Mathematics topics included in the course are as follows: arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and the negative counterparts of those sets of numbers; ratio, proportion and percent; measurement; introduction to the basic concepts of algebra. In order to prepare students for the rigors of college mathematics and work in other disciplines, specific college study skills are embedded in the course and practiced in class. Students discover their own learning styles and develop learning and study plans based on their educational goals and current lifestyles. Students will spend 4.5 hours in the classroom and 1.5 hours in a computer lab environment.Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*085 Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra

6 credits (3 lecture/3 lab)

Intended to take students from Pre-algebra through the end of Elementary Algebra in one semester. The topics covered will be the same as those covered in Elementary Algebra with additional support provided to review topics from Prealgebra as they are needed. The students will spend 3 hours in the classroom and 3 hours in a lab environment. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*094 Introductory Algebra

4 credits (3 lecture/1 lab)

Intended to take students from Pre-algebra through the end of Elementary Algebra in one semester. The topics covered will be the same as those covered in MAT *095 with additional support provided to review topics from Pre-algebra as they are needed. The students will spend 3 hours in the classroom and 1 hour in a lab environment. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*095 Elementary Algebra Foundations

3 credits (MAT-085)

For students who have never had algebra or who need to review algebraic concepts. This course includes a study of the basic properties and theorems of rational numbers; expressions and equations with polynomials, rational and radical expressions, and integer exponents; linear equations in one and two variables; systems of linear equations in two variables; functions and applications in geometry and algebra. This course does not satisfy a mathematics elective in any program. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score.(Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*135 Topics In Contemporary Math

3 credits

A practical course offering an exposure to a wide range of topics with an emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving and the real number system. Topics may include logic, financial management, set theory, metric system and probability and statistics. This course is intended for students registered in Criminal Justice, Business Office Technology, DARC, Human Services, Visual Fine Arts, Photography, and Graphic Design. Prerequisite: C- or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or placement into Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137). (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*137 Intermediate Algebra

3 credits (MAT-111) (51-111)

Serving as a prerequisite for most other first level credit Math courses, including College Algebra, Elementary Statistics with Computer Applications, Number Systems, Finite Mathematics and Math for the Liberal Arts. This course is a further study of algebra and mathematical modeling of functions and relations represented by tables, graphs, words, and symbols. Polynomial functions and expressions with special attention to linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and radical functions are studied. There is an emphasis on applications for all topics. Prerequisite: C- or better in Prealgebra and Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095) or appropriate placement test or SAT score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*137L Intermediate Algebra

for Liberal Arts

3 credits A credit level math course intended for students in NONSTEM programs of study. It is ONLY a pre-requisite f or Elementary Statistics with Computer Applications (MAT*165), Number Systems (MAT*141), and Math for the Liberal Arts (MAT*146). A further study of algebra and mathematical modeling of functions and relations represented by tables, graphs, words, and symbols. Topics covered will include Linear, Quadratic and Exponential Functions with an emphasis on modeling real-world applications. Prerequisites: C- or better in Pre-Algebra & Elementary Algebra (MAT*085), or Introductory Algebra (MAT*094), or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095), or appropriate placement test or SAT score.(Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*139 Elementary & Intermediate

Algebra Combined

4 credits (MAT-085) Combines the content of Elementary Algebra (MAT*095) with Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) in one semester. It also serves as a prerequisite for most other first level credit math courses, including Number Systems (MAT*141), Math for the Liberal Arts (MAT*146) Finite Mathematics (MAT*152), Elementary Statistics with Computer Application (MAT*165), and College Algebra (MAT*172). All of the topics covered in both Elementary Algebra (MAT*095) and Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) will be covered in this class. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score.(Elective Type:G/LAS/M) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*141 Number Systems

3 credits (MAT-103) (51-171)

Nature of Mathematics and theory of sets and logic are studied. Starting with natural numbers, the number system is extended by analysis of its properties to integers, rationals, reals and complex numbers. Various numeration systems are investigated. This course is recommended for students in Early Childhood, Elementary or Middle School Education Programs. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Intermediate Algebra for Liberal Arts (MAT*137L) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139) or appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*146 Math for the Liberal Arts

3 credits (MAT-105) (51-170)

This course is designed to meet the needs and program requirements of liberal arts and/or general studies majors. The course content includes the following core topics: inductive and deductive reasoning, sets, logic, number theory, geometry, probability and statistics. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Intermediate Algebra for Liberal Arts (MAT*137L) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139) or appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*152 Finite Mathematics

3 credits (MAT-124) (51-221)

Introduces basic modern mathematical tools for the study of applications in business, life, and social sciences. It also provides a more substantial algebraic foundation for those students who wish to continue with Calculus for Management, Life and Social Sciences or College Algebra or those who need a college-level Math course beyond Intermediate Algebra. Linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic equations, matrices and determinants, systems of equations and applications using linear programming are studied in depth. Note: This course is required for those students wishing to articulate from Tunxis Community College into the Business program at University of Connecticut. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139) OR appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*165 Elementary Statistics with

Computer Application

4 credits (MAT-104) (51-191) Introduction to statistical theory including the nature of statistical methods, exploratory data analysis, the rules of probability, frequency distributions, probability distributions (Binomial, Poisson, uniform, normal), sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Learning to do statistical analysis using technology is required of all students and is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Intermediate Algebra f or Liberal Arts (MAT*137L) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139) or appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7).

MAT*172 College Algebra

3 credits (MAT-116)

A credit course involving the higher-level topics in algebra needed for success in PreCalculus and, ultimately, the Calculus series. Topics to be included are the following: systems of equations, including two- and three-variable linear and nonlinear systems; graphing of higher-order functions using transformations, increasing/decreasing intervals, maxima/minima; inverse functions; graphing of nonlinear inequalities in one and two variables; conic sections; laws of logarithms, exponential and logarithmic functions, solving exponential and logarithmic equations; applications related to exponential and logarithmic functions; 4 operations on complex numbers; simplification of complex fractions; solving of polynomial and rational inequalities. The course will utilize the graphing calculator to a limited extent. Prerequisite: C+ or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139) or C- or better in Finite Mathematics (MAT*152) or appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/ LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*186 Precalculus

4 credits (MAT-130) (51-270)

Intended to prepare the student for the theory of Calculus I. Extensive work is done with polynomial and rational functions, including the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, Rational Roots Theorem, complete factorization, asymptotes and graphing. Detailed coverage of trigonometric functions (both right triangle and circular) includes graphing, trigonometric identities, the solving of equations, the Laws of Sines and Cosines and Inverse trigonometric functions. Other included topics are DeMoivre’s Theorem, polar coordinates, mathematical induction, the algebra of matrices and the Binomial Theorem. The graphing calculator is used when appropriate. Prerequisite: C- or better in College Algebra (MAT*172) OR appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*190 Calculus for Business

& Social Science I

3 credits (MAT-125) (51-274) Designed for students who plan to major in social, biological, behavioral, or managerial sciences. Topics include techniques of differentiation and integration, together with applications of the derivative and definite integral. Logarithmic and exponential functions are also examined for their applications. Note: Students transferring to University of Connecticut under the Business Articulation Agreement MUST take Finite Mathematics before this course. Prerequisite: C- or better in Finite Mathematics (MAT*152), OR C+ or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary & Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139); OR appropriate placement test score. (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*222 Statistics II with

Technology Applications

3 credits (MAT-201) (51-193) Designed for those students who desire a more in-depth study of statistics, especially those wishing to transfer to a four-year institution. Topics include hypothesis testing, statistical inference about means and proportions with two populations, linear regression and correlation, multiple regression, analysis of variance, inferences about population variances, goodness of fit and independence, and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Statistics with Computer Application (MAT*165).(Elective Type:G/LAS/M) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*254 Calculus I

4 credits (MAT-131) (51-271)

The limit and derivative of a function are developed. Applications include concavity, optimization problems and rectilinear motion. The definite integral and techniques of integration are also further studied. Applications of the definite integral include area under a curve, volumes of solids, arc length, work and center of mass. Prerequisite:C- or better in Precalculus (MAT*186).(Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*256 Calculus II

4 credits (MAT-132) (51-272)

The logarithmic and exponential functions along with their derivatives and integrals; models of growth and decay; inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions and their derivatives; integrals; further techniques of integration; indeterminate forms; improper integrals; infinite series; and power series representation of functions. Topics selected from analytic geometry include rotation of axis. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus I (MAT*254). (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works:QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*268 Calculus III: Multivariable

4 credits (MAT-210) (51-273)

A continuation of Calculus II. Included are vectors, the geometry of space and vector functions, along with applications. Partial differentiation and double and triple integration are undertaken, as well as their applications. Line integrals, Green’s Theorem and Stoke’s Theorem are included. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus II (MAT*256).(Elective Type:G/LAS/M) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*272 Linear Equations

3 credits

Provides a substantial introduction to linear algebra from a mathematical viewpoint. Major topics include linear systems, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues, diagonalization, inner products, and orthogonality. This course will include a study of mathematical proof and requires mature abstract reasoning abilities. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus II (MAT*256).(Elective Type:G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

MAT*285 Differential Equations

3 credits (MAT-210) (51-276)

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations, including the LaPlace Transform, are covered. Some elementary applications in geometry, physics, and chemistry are included. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus II (MAT*256).] (Elective Type: G/LAS/M) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: QUAX) (Ability Assessed: 7)

Mechanical Engineering Technology

MEC*264 Introduction to Materials Science

3 credits (TC-118) (21-118)

Introduces the principles and concepts of how industry changes forms of raw materials to increase value and usefulness. ºAwareness of the nature and characteristics of raw materials permits associations to be made regarding selection of processes by which materials may be changed. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement test into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G)

Meteorology

MET*101 Meteorology

3 credits (SCI-129) (55-191)

The concepts of atmospheric temperature, pressure, humidity, wind, and how these factors are measured. Investigation of the physical processes of the atmosphere in such areas as heat transfer, condensation and precipitation, stability-instability and lapse rate. Study of atmospheric circulation and weather changes. Course includes essentials of climatology. Examination includes selected meteorological applications of meteorology. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX) (Ability Assessed: 8)

Music

MUS*101 Music History and Appreciation I

3 credits (MUS-103) (78-112)

The formal and stylistic elements of music are presented together with necessary historical background through lecture, class discussion, and active listening. Includes a broad survey of significant musical styles from the Middle Ages to the present. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*103 History of American Music

3 credits

A survey of American music from the Colonial period to the present day in its historical and cultural context. Classical, folk, popular, jazz, and rock music will be covered through lecture, discussion, and active listening. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*110 Music Production

3 credits

2 lecture/2 studio Music production and recording techniques are presented in lecture, class discussion and studio work. Includes a broad overview of different careers within the music industry as well as an introduction to several instruments such as: guitar, piano, bass and drums. Musical experience is not necessary to enroll in this course. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*111 Fundamentals of Music I

3 credits (MUS-100) (78-111)

The elements of music, form, and style are presented together with necessary historical background. Includes a broad survey of 20th-century forms of music including ethnic, rock, folk, electronic, and aleatory music. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*138 Rock & Roll History Appreciation

3 credits

A survey of the evolution of rock music and the origins, characteristics, stylistic development, and cultural/social perspectives from its late-19th century influences to present day trends. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*147 Jazz Group Ensemble

3 credits

An introduction to the art of jazz improvisation for beginning and intermediate students who have at least two to three years of experience on their respective musical instruments. The course will be devoted to chord progressions and scales used in jazz improvisations, jazz rhythms and exercises to practice improvisation on select jazz compositions. Prerequisite: Two to three years of experience on a jazz instrument and the ability to read basic sheet music. Other requirements: Students must provide their own instruments and a music stand. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

MUS*148 Beginning Piano

3 credits

2 lecture/1 studio An introduction to the piano where students will learn the piano keyboard and acquire the basic skills to read general musical notation as related to the piano. Additionally, an understanding and application of the basic chords and scales will be covered. Students will also receive a foundation in music theory and appreciation as it relates to the piano. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

New Media Communication

NMC*101 New Media Perspectives

3 credits (COMM-101)

What qualities do video games, comics, films, and computer simulations share? New Media Perspectives considers this question by examining the underlying structures and interrelated qualities of various media and communication technologies. Students will study selected text-based stories, films, video games, simulations, comics, visual art, and web design. Students will apply what they learn by developing hypertexts, digital stories, and games. The course will also address questions such as: what is new media? How does human experience shape the design of technology? What is interactivity? Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

NMC*200 Digital Narrative

3 credits (2 lecture/2 studio)

Students draw from their experience in New Media Perspectives and explore, analyze, and create digital narratives. These digital works will include games, hypertexts, and hypermedia demonstrations. Students will develop and complete projects, collaborating both on-ground and online. This course may be team-taught. Prerequisites: C- or better in New Media Perspectives (NMC*101),Composition (ENG*101) or permission ofDepartment Chair. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

NMC*220 Writing with Video

3 credits

This course engages students in a comprehensive exploration of video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of video work. Directed writing is integrated into all aspects of the production process — brainstorming and conceptualization, drafting and storyboarding, revision, and critique. Writing is positioned as an integral part of the process of thinking, problem solving, and creating. Prerequisites: C- or better in New Media Perspectives (NMC*101) and C- or better in Composition (ENG*101), or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

NMC*240 Topics in New Media

3 credits

Provides students opportunity to engage in focused new media research projects or with a new media software environment. Research projects may be individual or teambased depending on the subject for the semester. The course emphasizes problem solving and new media literacy. Students will work on projects online and on-ground. The content f or this course changes by semester. Prerequisites: C- or better in Digital Narrative (NMC*200) or Writing with Video (NMC*220), and C- or better in Programming Logic and Design with Visual Basic (CSC*126), Design Principles (GRA*101) or Introduction to Computer Graphics (GRA*110).Thiscourse may be taken twice f or credit. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

NMC*290 Internship in New Media

3 credits

Provides students opportunity to apply new media literacy and project building abilities in production environments. Students will work with a variety of communication media, such as video, podcasting, and social software. Supplementary documents should be supplied with this course documenting the agency or body for which work or service agreement is applicable; the nature of the work or service to be completed or the goals to be met; and the nature of assessment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 30 Credits in the program. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/ LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

NMC*295 New Media Portfolio

3 credits

Students will prepare a portfolio and resume that demonstrates previously developed work in new media production, new media literacy, problem solving, communication, design, and technology literacy for use in transfer application and employment search. Topics covered include: self assessment; portfolio design and creation; resume design; distribution and presentation methods of the new media portfolio; job search; and college transfer options. Prerequisites: C- or better in Digital Narrative (NMC*200),Writing withVideo (NMC*220),Topics in New Media (NMC*210), Programming for New Media (CSA*157), Internship in New Media Communication (NMC*211). (Elective Type: FA/G/ HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: AESX/ CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

Philosophy

PHL*101 Introduction to Philosophy

3 credits (PHI-100) (13-131)

Introduction to Philosophy surveys major problems and questions in philosophy, drawing from sources dating from ancient through modern periods. The course identifies basic branches, movements, and developments of philosophy in one or more historical traditions. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

PHL*111 Ethics

3 credits (PHI-204) (13-171)

Designed to further the understanding of the major issues and arguments of ethics from both theoretical and applied ethics positions. The major positions on moral issues will be critically examined through sound, rational argumentation. Subjects treated will be chosen from among current arenas of concern, such as technology, the environment, the biomedical field, the creating and taking of life, and gender and racial equity. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 3)

PHL*131 Logic

3 credits (PHI-110)

Logic is the study of reasoning. It promotes skill in evaluating persuasive language according to general standards of validity. This course introduces forms of deductive and inductive reasoning and methods of evaluation. Attention is given to argument recognition, fallacy identification, and the analysis of reasoning in ordinary language. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

PHL*150 Philosophy of Religion

3 credits (PHI-121) (13-121)

A philosophical inquiry into the nature, logic, and meaning of religion. Such inquiry involves analyzing the language and reasoning that form religious truth claims, as well as advancing rational arguments as to whether a divine being (or state of being) exists or could exist. The course will examine a broad range of religious concepts, including immortality, an afterlife, evil, and miracles, along with the role of interreligious dialogue and modern science in this area of study. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks:CRIX) (Abilities Assessed:2,11)

PHL*151 World Religions

3 credits (PHI-126)

Surveys the spiritual ideas and practices which have sustained human beings in their various environments. The formation and early development of each religious tradition will be examined in historical context. Religious traditions to be examined include the indigenous religions of Africa and the Americas and the maj or world “source” religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. Religious Studies is a secular academic discipline that leaves room for a wide range of personal reflection. Key doctrinal, philosophical, ethical, social and psychological dimensions of the religions will be considered (from both content/practice-based and discipline-specific perspectives). A significant portion of learning in this course takes place through fieldwork. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: CRIX) (Abilities Assessed: 3, 4)

Physics

PHY*110 Introductory Physics

4 credits (PHYS-101) (53-103)

3 lecture/2 lab One-semester introductory physics for the non-science major. The basic concepts of Newtonian mechanics, fluids, heat, electricity and magnetism, light, sound, relativity and quantum mechanics are examined. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in Prealgebra and Elementary Algebra (MAT*085) or IntroductoryAlgebra (MAT*094) or ElementaryAlgebra Foundations (MAT*095).(Elective Type:G/LAS/S) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9) ElementaryAlgebra (MAT*085) or IntroductoryAlgebra (MAT*094) or Elementary Algebra Foundations (MAT*095), OR placement into any credit-level mathematics course. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

PHY*121 General Physics I

4 credits (PHYS-121) (53-101)

3 lecture/3 lab Introductory physics course covering measurements, Newton’s laws of motion, gravity, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, static equilibria, fluids, oscillations, conservation laws, waves, sound, temperature, heat transfer and thermodynamics. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary and Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/ SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8,9) Algebra (MAT*137) or Elementary and Intermediate Algebra Combined (MAT*139). Intermediate Algebra for Liberal Arts (MAT*137L) is NOT sufficient for entry into this course.

PHY*122 General Physics II

4 credits (PHYS-122) (53-102)

3 lecture/3 lab Continuation of General Physics I. Topics include: principles of electricity and magnetism, including electric and magnetic fields, electric currents in magnetic fields, and electromagnetic radiation, light, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:C- or better in General Physics I (PHY*121).(Elective Type:G/LAS/S) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

PHY*221 Calculus-Based Physics I

4 credits (PHYS-151) (53-151)

3 lecture/3 lab Introductory physics course intended for science and engineering majors covering measurement, Newton’s Laws of Motion, gravity, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, static equilibria, fluids, oscillations, conservation laws, waves, sound, temperature, heat transfer and thermodynamics. Lecture and laboratory. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus I (MAT*254)or permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

PHY*222 Calculus-Based Physics II

4 credits (PHYS-152) (53-152)

3 lecture/3 lab A continuation of Calculus-Based Physics I. Topics include principles of electricity and magnetism, including electric and magnetic fields, electric currents in magnetic fields, and electromagnetic radiation, light, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Intended for science and engineering majors. Prerequisite: C- or better in Calculus-Based Physics I (PHY*221). (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SCKX/SCRX) (Abilities Assessed: 8, 9)

Polish

PLH*111 Elementary Polish I

4 credits

Presents the pronunciation and phonetic system of Polish, basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical principles. The course involves all four language skill areas: listening comprehension, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing. Introduces fundamental information about the geography, history, and culture of Poland. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Political Science

POL*111 American Government

3 credits (GOVT-103) (32-103)

Explores the structure, function, and evolution of the U.S. government. The three branches of government, the bureaucracy, civil liberties, and civil rights will be examined. The Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, political parties, public opinion, interest groups and contemporary policy are also investigated. The relationship between the federal, state, and local governments will also be considered. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

POL*112 State & Local Government

3 credits

The concept, structure and operation of state and local government in the United States are examined in the U.S. federal system. Special emphasis is placed on the workings of Connecticut’s state and local governmental units. Prerequisites: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096), or Reading &Writing VI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

POL*225 The Constitution and

3 credits American Society

Examines both the historical foundation of the U.S. Constitution and its evolving interpretation. Provides students with an opportunity to understand and discuss the major Supreme Court decisions in American history and their impact on American society. Students also will learn about the Constitution in relation to the concept, structure, and application of American government. Students who satisfactorily complete

POL*225 may not take HIS*225. Prerequisites: C- or better in

Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075), or Introduction

to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093), or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading andWritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/HU/ LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Abilities Assessed: 2, 11)

Psychology

PSY*100 Personal Growth & Development

3 credits

Human adjustment with emphasis on personal growth, interpersonal relationships, health and stress, and socio-cultural challenges are studied. Topics of self-esteem, learning styles, human development and effective coping mechanisms are also considered. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

PSY*111 General Psychology I

3 credits (PSY-101) (34-101)

Introduction to the methodology and history of psychology with emphasis on the topics of learning, thinking, personality, development, motivation, emotion, behavior disorders, therapy, and social psychology. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading &Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

PSY*201 Life Span Development

3 credits

Examines developmental psychology, including theories and methodologies used by developmental psychologists. The course will examine continuity and change from conception to death and the interaction of biological, psychological and social aspects of development. The course will prepare students for more advanced courses in developmental psychology. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/ SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

PSY*203 Child Development

3 credits (PSY-211) (34-219)

Childhood from conception to adolescence is examined, with emphasis on the areas of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, language, and sex-role development. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks: GLKY/SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

PSY*220 Educational Psychology

3 credits (PSY-220)

Focuses on the theories of learning and teaching as well as their practical applications in the classroom. Topics include cognitive and social development, intelligence and ability, motivation and assessment. While not exclusively designed for future teachers, the connection between theory and practice will be explored using a variety of learner styles in a variety of settings.Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

PSY*240 Social Psychology

3 credits (PSY-240)

Examines the individual’s interaction with society. Topics include learning about the self, including the formation of self-concept; understanding personal relationships, behavi or in groups, and the development of attitudes and behaviors. Prerequisite: C- or better in both Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/ LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

PSY*243 Theories of Personality

3 credits (PSY-221) (34-227)

Will familiarize students with the major models of personality theory, their history, and applications. Emphasis will be placed on views which discuss the unique quality of the personality, genetic factors, interpersonal dynamics, and the influence of the family. Current research questions, such as stability of the personality over time and in various situations and cultural differences in personality development, will also be considered. Psycho-dynamic, humanistic, trait, biological, existential, and learning theorists will be analyzed. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) and General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

PSY*245 Abnormal Psychology

3 credits (PSY-222) (34-291)

An introduction to the study of mental disorders with consideration of their origins, symptoms, treatment, and prevention. Disorders to be examined include anxiety and mood disorders, personality disorders, disorders of childhood, and schizophrenia. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in General Psychology I (PSY*111). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

PSY*246 Psychology & Religion

3 credits

Introduces students to the major issues, research, and theoretical approaches to the psychology of religion. The study of religion has prompted more questions than answers regarding various phenomena such as religious conversion, the nature of cults, understanding religious belief and behavior, and the socio-cultural blending of mysticism, religion, and science. This course examines religiosity from the psychological perspective as it pertains to personality development, mental health, social behavior, and the human existential experience. It is important to note that this course does not attempt to validate or negate the tenets of any religion; rather, the focus of study centers around the human mind as it grapples with the psychological realm of religion. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) and C- or better in General PsychologyI (PSY*111) or permission of Department Chair.(Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

Russian

RUS*101 Elementary Russian I

3 credits

Students enrolled in Elementary Russian I will develop communicative competency in the Russian Language incorporating linguistic functions specific to reading, speaking, and writing appropriate to the first class at the Elementary Level. This will include topics that deal with conversational topics for everyday life as well as fundamental information on the history and culture of Russia. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Science

SCI*130 Introduction to Forensic Science

4 credits

3 lecture/2 lab Clarifies forensic science for a wide variety of students who are aligned with the criminal justice or forensic science profession. It will emphasize the role of the crime scene investigator in preserving, recording, and collecting physical evidence at the crime scene. The use of DNA in forensics will be explained in a manner that is comprehensible and relevant. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) (Elective Type: G/LAS/S) (Ability Assessed: 9, 11)

Sociology

SOC*101 Principles of Sociology

3 credits (SOC-101) (36-101)

Introduction to the analysis of social institutions and processes including sociological theory and method, culture and personality, human ecology and population, and social organization and disorganization. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading & Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162),or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in DegreeWorks: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*103 Social Problems

3 credits (SOC-103) (36-103)

Selected contemporary American social problems are studied from the sociological perspective. Problem areas such as poverty, race, crime and violence, marriage and family problems, drugs and alcoholism, unemployment and work, sex roles and sexism, and other relevant issues are covered. Prerequisites: C- in Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENG*065), or placement into Integrated Reading and Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading and Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading & Writing VI (ESL*162). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*106 Technology and Society

3 credits (SOC-160) (36-155)

A range of interdisciplinary topics is studied including the historical development of technology, contemporary questions of population, energy and the environment, social political and ethical issues surrounding the use of technology, future shock, and technology assessment. Prerequisite: C- or better in Integrated Reading & Writing II (ENG*075) or Introduction to College Reading &Writing (ENG*093) or Introduction to College English (ENG*096) or Reading &WritingVI (ESL*162), or placement into Composition (ENG*101).(Elective Type:G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX)

SOC*114 Sociology of Aging

3 credits

Examines the roles and status of older people in a changing social structure. Social issues of aging such as employment, retirement, family relations, and housing are analyzed. Prerequisite: C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*210 Sociology of the Family

3 credits (SOC-150) (36-181)

Study of psychological, sociological, and other factors important to the development of a sound base for successful marriage and parenthood. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*220 Racial and Ethnic Diversity

3 credits (SOC-220) (36-145)

Examines the racial and ethnic composition of the United States and the impact of race and ethnicity upon the distribution of power and opportunity. Major theoretical perspectives will be considered along with patterns of inter-ethnic and inter-racial contact. The politics of minority status and the growth and development of social movements to alter existing arrangements will be studied. Prerequisites:C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*240 Criminology

3 credits (SOC-200) (35-122)

The nature and cause of crime, approaches to the study of crime, and its treatment and prevention are explored. The sociology of criminal law and the nature of criminal behavior are also examined. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

SOC*241 Juvenile Delinquency

3 credits (SOC-210) (36-106)

The concept of juvenile delinquency is examined. The relationships between social attitudes and definitions of youthful law violations, along with studies of various forms of delinquency, are considered. Diverse theoretical interpretations of delinquency are analyzed, including subcultural theories, physiologic factors, emotional pressures, and environmental pressures. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 2)

SOC*242 Sociology of Deviance

3 credits (SOC-242)

A sociological analysis of deviant behaviors and subcultures. Sociological theories of deviance will be examined and applied to the following topics: alcohol and drug use, violence, mental illness, crime, and sexual behavior. Special attention will also be given to social groups and communities whose customs and way of life are considered to be unconventional by contemporary standards. Prerequisite: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

SOC*257 Sociology of Mental Health Illness

3 credits

Examines Mental Health & Illness from a Sociological perspective and considers how the organization of social life, including socioeconomic status, marital status, age, and community ties affects psychological states. This course critically examines how the definitions of both mental health and mental illness reflect the normative ideologies of the broader dominant culture, how these definitions change within the sociopolitical and historical context, and to what degree mental illness is socially constructed. Prerequisites: C- or better in Composition (ENG*101) AND C- or better in Principles of Sociology (SOC*101). (Elective Type: G/LAS/ SS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in Degree Works: SOCX) (Ability Assessed: 10)

Spanish

SPA*111 Elementary Spanish I

4 credits

Presents the essentials of Spanish grammar needed to read, write, and interact in Spanish using simple phrases and common expressions, and highlights the diverse cultures of SpanishSpeaking peoples. Context for learning is self, family, school and community. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

SPA*112 Elementary Spanish II

4 credits

Builds and expands skills from Elementary Spanish I with further study of Spanish grammar and of the diverse cultures of Spanishspeaking peoples. Students begin to negotiate simple transactions and dilemmas in Spanish using more complex phrases and common expressions. Context for learning is studying activities from daily life. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Spanish I (SPA*101 or SPA*111) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

SPA*135 Hispanic Culture and Conversation

3 credits

An intermediate level Spanish course designed to build oral proficiency and conversation skills through the study of Hispanic culture. Students will narrate, discuss, report, and interact in group situations using Spanish. Topics will connect to Hispanic culture and come from a variety of sources including readings, video, film, television, and the internet. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Spanish II (SPA*102) or Permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

SPA*211 Intermediate Spanish I

4 credits

Builds and expands skills from Elementary Spanish I and II with further study of Spanish grammar and of the diverse cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. A secondary focus is on expanding reading and writing skills. Students continue to refine their use of practical, conversational Spanish. The context for learning is understanding the experiences of the Spanish speaking peoples. Prerequisite: C- or better in Elementary Spanish II (SPA*102 or SPA*112) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

SPA*212 Intermediate Spanish II

4 credits

Builds and expands skills from Intermediate Spanish I with further study of Spanish grammar and of diverse cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. A secondary focus remains on expanding reading and writing skills. Students continue to refine their use of practical, conversational Spanish. The context for learning is understanding the experiences of the Spanish speaking peoples. Prerequisite: C- or better in Intermediate Spanish I (SPA*201 or SPA*211) OR permission of Department Chair. (Elective Type: FL/G/HU/LAS) (Ability Assessed: 6)

Technology Studies

TCN*293 Practicum in Technology I

3 credits (21-251) (TC-251)

Independent activity on an assigned internship/field placement or project. Includes necessary time management, research, written status reports, and teamwork under the direction of a faculty member. Parameters of the individual internship/field placement or project will be established at the beginning of the semester. This course is open only to those students who are currently enrolled in Technology Studies certificate and/or degree programs. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator.(Elective Type:G)

Theater

THR*101 Introduction to Theater

3 credits

Introduction to Theater explores the history of theater, introduces students to the study of dramatic literature in the context of performance. It also surveys the contributions of directors, designers, actors, stage managers, and front- and back-of-house personnel to the staging of a production. Finally it introduces students to the fundamentals of staging a play through small in-class performances and/or work on main-stage productions. (Elective Type:FA/G/HU/LAS) (TransferTicket Competency in Degree Works:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 1)

THR*110 Acting I

3 credits

A practical approach to the art of acting, with special attention to the development of the actor’s instrument, including voice, body, the senses, creativity, and interpretation. The course combines individual and group exercises and assignments. (Elective Type: FA/G/HU/LAS) (Transfer Ticket Competency in DegreeWorks:AESX/CRTY) (Ability Assessed: 6)

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